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Archive for the ‘wedding photography’ Category

Sep
11

Wedding Photography: Shooting The Rings

Filed Under Digital Photography School, Other Photography Tips, Photography Tips and Tutorials, wedding photography

This bride and groom are both serving in the army, and both are gun enthusiasts. I asked the groom if he had their guns handy, and a bullet, and came up with this shot as one of the ring shots. This shot was taken in available light, under a tent outdoors.  EOS 5D Mark III with EF 100mm f/2.8L IS; ISO 2500, f/16, 1/125.

This bride and groom are both serving in the army, and both are gun enthusiasts. I asked the groom if he had their guns handy, and a bullet, and came up with this shot as one of the ring shots. This shot was taken in available light, under a tent outdoors. EOS 5D Mark III with EF 100mm f/2.8L IS; ISO 2500, f/16, 1/125.

In my career in photography, I’ve chosen not to focus on weddings as a business model, and shoot only a few every year.  I try to avoid being “traditional” in my approach to weddings, mixing traditional shots or types of shots with my own approach- which may or may not have been borrowed from other photographers I have worked with.

One such shot is the ring shot. It is what’s known as a detail shot, and while this may not be the most important shot of the wedding, it is one of the shots that helps sets the tone of an album, and can allow for a lot of creativity if you have the time.  If the shot fails, it will definitely be noticed.

The bride and groom in this wedding had a special affinity for the beach, and brought a beach theme to their wedding. Shells were scattered about the tables. I selected a few and quickly shot the rings on a table. The room was brightly lit with daylight pouring in the windows nearby, and I set my flash to bounce off the ceiling to add just a touch more light. . EOS-1D X, EF 100mm f/2.8L IS. ISO 800, 1/250, f/5.6.

The bride and groom in this wedding had a special affinity for the beach, and brought a beach theme to their wedding. Shells were scattered about the tables. I selected a few and quickly shot the rings on a table. The room was brightly lit with daylight pouring in the windows nearby, and I set my flash to bounce off the ceiling to add just a touch more light. . EOS-1D X, EF 100mm f/2.8L IS. ISO 800, 1/250, f/5.6.

There are many ways to go about these types of shots, some more cliche than others. The one that always comes to mind is a shot of the rings resting on the invitation, or the rings casting a shadow of a heart on a Bible opened to 1st Corinthians. My preference is to find something personal that connects the rings to the bride and groom, or else I’ll pull something from the theme of the day.  It may take some digging with your clients to find that personal connection- maybe a story about how they met, or something they share together, but once you find it, it can make shooting the ring shot a lot more fun. If I can’t find a personal connection, I’ll use flowers, the bouquet, or a even a champagne cork.  Be creative. There are a lot of ways to photograph wedding rings that will make them stand out.

There was no overriding theme at this wedding, and as a second shooter I didn't have time to get to know the bride and groom. I found a flower arrangement and played with several arrangements before settling on this one. EOS 5D Mark III, EF 100mm f/2.8L IS. I bounced the flash off the ceiling for this shot. ISO 800, f/8, 1/200.

There was no overriding theme at this wedding, and as a second shooter I didn’t have time to get to know the bride and groom. I found a flower arrangement and played with several arrangements before settling on this one. EOS 5D Mark III, EF 100mm f/2.8L IS. I bounced the flash off the ceiling for this shot. ISO 800, f/8, 1/200.

Technically, while a macro lens is helpful, it’s not absolutely necessary.  You can highlight the rings in whatever setting you choose, but be careful not to let them get lost in the setting.    Typically I use a Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS macro lens, but any lens that will let you get fairly close will work, depending on your composition. Ideally, I would use off-camera flash every time, but weddings tend to me fast moving events, and there isn’t always time to do it the way you’d prefer.  In this case, I’ll set up a small reflector or bounce card to bounce the flash and give a better quality light.  I will often try several angles to get different looks.  Outdoor weddings during the day are a bit easier. I’ll look for a shaded area and shoot the rings in the available light.

Ring shots are often my most fun shot of the day.  There’s no one stressing about their hair or makeup, and no one trying to pull their attention in a different direction.  So use the ring shot as your moment of peace on an otherwise busy day, and have some fun with it.

This shot was also from the military wedding. The bride and groom are knife enthusiasts as well. The groom gave me one of his knives and I played with a few arrangements before shooting this one. EOS 5D Mark III, EF 100mm f/2.8L IS. ISO 3200, f/9, 1/125.

This shot was also from the military wedding. The bride and groom are knife enthusiasts as well. The groom gave me one of his knives and I played with a few arrangements before shooting this one. EOS 5D Mark III, EF 100mm f/2.8L IS. ISO 3200, f/9, 1/125.

This is another set up from the military wedding.  His 'n' hers .45's.  This shot doesn't require a macro lens, though I used the EF 100mm f/2.8L. EOS 5D Mark II, Ef 100mm f/2.8L IS. ISO 3200, f/16, 1/160.

This is another set up from the military wedding. His ‘n’ hers .45′s. This shot doesn’t require a macro lens, though I used the EF 100mm f/2.8L. EOS 5D Mark II, Ef 100mm f/2.8L IS. ISO 3200, f/16, 1/160.

Post originally from: Digital Photography Tips.

Check out our more Photography Tips at Photography Tips for Beginners, Portrait Photography Tips and Wedding Photography Tips.

Wedding Photography: Shooting The Rings

Feb
22

Weddings Through The Eyes of a “Noob”: Lessons I Learned

Filed Under Digital Photography School, Other Photography Tips, Photography Tips and Tutorials, Portrait Photography, wedding photography

One of the things I'll do is set up a remote camera in the back of the ceremony, elevated if possible.  In this shot, a tilt-shift lens was used to create that miniature look.  EOS 5D Mark III, TS-E 17mm f/4L. Exposure was 1/320, ISO 3200, f/4.

One of the things I’ll do is set up a remote camera in the back of the ceremony, elevated if possible. In this shot, a tilt-shift lens was used to create that miniature look. EOS 5D Mark III, TS-E 17mm f/4L. Exposure was 1/320, ISO 3200, f/4. Photo by Rick Berk/kNot Photography

Throughout the first 20 years of my career in photography, I’d photographed a lot of different things- NHL All-Star games, Major League Baseball, NFL Football. I’d photographed portraits, boudoir, model portfolios. Landscape photography became a passion of mine. One thing I never photographed was a wedding.  When I began my career, I assisted on exactly two weddings. Never did I shoot one.  The two weddings I assisted on went so badly that I never wanted to touch one again.  I thought all weddings were like that. It wasn’t until years later that I understood it was more the photographer I worked for than it was the weddings themselves.

This type of shot is the kind that makes for a nice touch in the overall collection from a wedding.  They complete the set and really show a photographer's attention to detail.  EOS-1D X, EF 100mm f/2.8L IS Macro. ISO 800, 1/200, f/8.

This type of shot is the kind that makes for a nice touch in the overall collection from a wedding. They complete the set and really show a photographer’s attention to detail. EOS-1D X, EF 100mm f/2.8L IS Macro. ISO 800, 1/200, f/8. Photo by Rick Berk/ OneRedTreePhoto.com

For a variety of reasons, I made myself available as a second shooter in 2012, and got my first taste shooting weddings.  That first one was intimidating, but I learned a few things along the way.

This is a must. Depending on the setting it will always change, but at least one formal portrait of the bride is essential.  This shot simply used on camera flash, bounced into a reflector at camera left. EOS-1D X, EF 85mm f/1.2L II. 1/250, f/1.2, ISO 400.

This is a must. Depending on the setting it will always change, but at least one formal portrait of the bride is essential. This shot simply used on camera flash, bounced into a reflector at camera left. EOS-1D X, EF 85mm f/1.2L II. 1/250, f/1.2, ISO 400. Photo by Rick Berk/OneRedTreePhoto.com

1. Prepare and be organized.

Prior to the wedding day, speak to the bride and groom about what shots they absolutely must have. Plan when and where you will be shooting each of the shots. If you’re doing group shots in the park, make sure they know that’s the plan, and when you need them there.  Keep a shot list with you. Don’t promise anything more than that you will try to get these shots, because things could always happen preventing you from getting the shot. But at least this way you know what to try and focus on.  This is also where you manage their expectations so they understand that you can’t possibly get EVERYTHING, but you will try to get what’s most important to them.

2. It’s your job to manage things.

Your bride and groom have a ton on their plates on the wedding day. Photography is the last thing on their mind. But you still need to get the shots and you need to do so as efficiently as possible so as not to hold up the proceedings.  Gentle reminders to the bride and groom about the shots they wanted will help, especially if you can give them a few minutes warning. For instance, “We need to get the family portrait, and we have a window in 5 minutes if we can get you all together,” works fine.  They WILL ask why the shot isn’t there if you don’t get it, and even if they are resistant during the event, they will thank you later.

3. Do what you can without their cooperation.

Yes, there will be some shots you absolutely need to pull the bride and groom away for.  But if you can manage to get shots without interfering in their activities, you’ll be exactly the kind of wedding photographer everyone wants- an invisible one who delivers the goods. Shoot preparation shots, detail shots of the rings, the cake, etc., while you have the free time and nothing else is going on. Getting those kinds of shots out of the way makes it easier to get the really important stuff later.

4. Don’t try to go it alone.

It’s easy to underestimate how much work goes into shooting a wedding. Many times, a photographer’s first taste is when a friend asks them.  It’s an honor to be asked, but it’s also a great responsibility.  Theoretically, this is a once in a lifetime event.  You can’t be everywhere at once.  The weddings I worked as a second shooter, I wasn’t a secondary shooter.  I just wasn’t the guy contracted to do the job.  But I shared responsibility for getting certain shots. For instance, the bride and groom getting ready at different locations. One of us would go to the bride’s, one to the groom’s. We’d meet back at the church, or at another location where we might be doing shots, depending on how the day is planned.  This takes a huge amount of pressure off.  In terms of the ceremony, it ensures that multiple angles are covered so if one of you is blocked, the other might have a chance at getting the shot.

5. Be on the lookout for those special moments.

It can be easy to focus on the primary photos and lose sight of those smaller, special moments that, when captured, make for the best images. Be on the lookout for a tender moment between bride and groom, the bride and her father, or the groom and his mother. Look for moments with friends and relatives that might end up telling a story.  This means your camera is always ready and you are always watching. There is no time to let down your guard.

6. Approach it like any other shoot.

There are a lot of little moments that make up a wedding day. Near the end of the father-daughter dance, the bride looked up and had this beautiful expression of admiration for her father. When her mother saw the image, tears came to her eyes.  As a photographer, those are the moments I live for.

There are a lot of little moments that make up a wedding day. Near the end of the father-daughter dance, the bride looked up and had this beautiful expression of admiration for her father. When her mother saw the image, tears came to her eyes. As a photographer, those are the moments I live for. Photo by Rick Berk/OneRedTreePhoto.com

One common theme I’ve heard from all photographers thinking of diving into the wedding pool is that they build it up so much that they become intimidated by it. You were hired for your expertise, so approach it like anything else. Look for creative shots you can use to illustrate the day, to give a storybook feel to the images, and to capture the emotion. If you need the bride and groom and other family members in a certain spot, direct them as you would a portrait shoot. Don’t be afraid to ask for them to do something for you if you think that by doing so, you can provide them with a shot that will make them remember the day fondly for the rest of their lives.

7. Use ALL of what you have.

In my bag at most weddings I keep a 24-70mm lens and 70-200mm lens.  These are my workhorse lenses. But I try to offer variety and for me this means using different lenses for different shots.  I have a 100mm macro for ring and detail shots, but also for portraits.  I use a fisheye lens for some candids on the dance floor. I’ll use an ultra wide angle like a 16-35mm.  I keep a couple of speedlites with me.  Sometimes I use them on camera, sometimes off, and sometimes I turn it off and just shoot available light.  The point of all this is to provide variety.  Different shots with different looks create more interest when the images are viewed as a collection. Yes, you could get away with using a 24-70 for the entire day, but I like to change things up when I can.

8. Have backup.

This means a backup camera, flash, batteries, memory cards.  Anything that can die, go bad, break, corrupt.  If you are being paid, you are considered professional, and being a professional means that the words “My camera broke” cannot be used as an excuse.

9. Check with the officiant

Each priest, minister, judge, or other officiant I have worked with so far has had a different set of rules where photography during the ceremony is concerned. Prior to the ceremony, introduce yourself, and ask what is permissible and what isn’t as far as you are concerned. Is flash ok during the ceremony? Where would he prefer you NOT be during the ceremony? Laying the ground rules beforehand can make a huge difference in how you cover the event.

10. Have fun!

Weddings are fun, happy occasions. Enjoy it. There’s good music, happy people, and you get to capture the memories. If you are enjoying yourself, it will show in your work.

For 20 years I always swore I wouldn’t touch a wedding.  But having shot three of them now, I find I enjoy the challenge and creativity of capturing these once (or twice) in a lifetime event for the couples I’ve worked with. No, they aren’t for everyone. But with the right attitude and know-how, they can be incredibly satisfying to shoot.

When the dancing started I decided I wanted something different. I mounted a 5D Mark III on a monopod with 14mm lens. a flash was mounted on the camera with the head aimed at the ceiling for bounce. Using a remote release, I got the bride's attention and waited for her reaction, firing when I saw it.

When the dancing started I decided I wanted something different. I mounted a 5D Mark III on a monopod with 14mm lens. a flash was mounted on the camera with the head aimed at the ceiling for bounce. I held the camera out over the dance floor by extending the monopod a few feet. Using a remote release, I got the bride’s attention and waited for her reaction, firing when I saw it. Photo by Rick Berk/kNot Photography

The church had these huge windows with light pouring in.  I knew I wanted to use it but time was tight.  I grabbed the bride and groom quickly and asked them to stand by the window and look out.  I fired off a handful of shots varying the exposure a bit. The black and white conversion added a nice artful touch. EOS-1D X with EF 24-70 f/2.8L II. ISO 1250, 1/100 f/5.6.

The church had these huge windows with light pouring in. I knew I wanted to use it but time was tight. I grabbed the bride and groom quickly and asked them to stand by the window and look out. I fired off a handful of shots varying the exposure a bit. The black and white conversion added a nice artful touch. EOS-1D X with EF 24-70 f/2.8L II. ISO 1250, 1/100 f/5.6. Photo by Rick Berk/OneRedTreePhoto.com

Further Wedding Photography Reading:

Post originally from: Digital Photography Tips.

Check out our more Photography Tips at Photography Tips for Beginners, Portrait Photography Tips and Wedding Photography Tips.

Weddings Through The Eyes of a “Noob”: Lessons I Learned

Dec
2

StickyAlbums Mobile Portfolios [REVIEW]

Filed Under Digital Photography Resources, Digital Photography School, Make Money From Photography, Portrait Photography, Post Production Tips, wedding photography

StickyAlbums is, at its heart, a tool for generating word-of-mouth referrals for professional photographers. As you will see in this review, the system is not set up for the casual photographer, as the free version is more of a means of introduction and trial than it is a full blown service, like gmail or Flickr.

StickyAlbums is a way to create a mobile portfolio of images, either in general or for a specific client. The creation of the portfolio takes place on stickyalbums.com and the viewing is optimized for mobile devices, such a tablets or smartphones. While the portfolios are known to be 100% compatible with iOS devices, not every single version of Android can be tested, although I was informed the app should work on just about any Droid phone or tablet.

Albums are created by uploading images to stickyalbums.com, creating a couple of splash pages, some simple formats and then delivery to clients. Clients will receive a link which will ask them if they want to download the album, which will show up as an ‘app’ on the desktop of their mobile device. From there, clients can browse, zoom and share albums. The service has basic features, like stats for number of downloads, and is ready for prime time, while still under development and improvement based on customer feedback.

Getting Started

Let me start by pointing out the free version is good for one album of 12 images as a trial.  If you want to skip this review and give it a try yourself, go to http://www.stickyalbums.com/pricing/. The next level up is a monthly subscription ($21/mo) which allows for use of youtube videos as well as images and lifetime hosting. The highest level offers everything the monthly subscription offers plus the option to use your own branding on albums, unlimited uploads, password protected albums and lifetime hosting of albums. It is appropriately called the “Professional” version and runs $189/year.

The basic process is this:

  • Pick a number of images for the album you want to create. The album shouldn’t be much more than 10-40 images because there is a 50MB download limit for most devices.
  • Resize the images to be 1600px on the long edge.
  • Now gather some special images. These will be a logo (rectangular), desktop icon and two splash screen, or ‘loading’ images. The loading images can be of anything and created using Photoshop to include your logo as well.
  • Start stepping through the album creation process where it will ask for your images, desktop icon, logo, email address, phone number, web address and loading pages.
  • Create the album and share!

I found the process to be easy once I ran through it a couple of times. It helps that logos and other info (my website, email, etc…) can be stored on the site for easy entry when creating an album.

I’m not going to give a step-by-step tutorial here because they already have a well organized page that describes how to arrange files and use the service to create an album. That can be found here http://www.stickyalbums.com/create-your-branding-files/

In The Real World

What it is like using StickyAlbums? With a recent upgrade to the site, it is easy and useful. Not that it wasn’t useful before, but some small issues with organizing images have been fixed and the ability to see basic stats (how many downloads) was added. The Professional version also allows for password protected albums.

How can you use StickyAlbums? If you are a pro, there are a number of ways. I have used it as a basic means to share images with clients, such as wedding clients, before and after delivery of final images. Brides with smartphones are an excellent market for this app as it place their wedding images in an easy to carry package to show friends. No need for your clients to save all the images and page through them inside their phone’s ‘Photos’ album. This product stands by itself as a desktop icon.

It can be used as a basic portfolio to send to connected clients. It can also be used as a promotional tool. For instance, let’s say you perform a studio shoot with a client, such as a high school senior. Inside the album you send to the senior and their parents you include 20 images from the shoot. Also included is an image you create in Photoshop that is a 20% off coupon for another shoot, complete with your phone number and email address, either for them or for a friend. Referrals are the lifeblood of many studio photographers and this app helps put your name and contact info right into the hands of your client when they are showing their friends how great they look during your studio shoot.

There is some downside to the app. It can become large, the downloads I mean. A lot of devices demand use of wifi if a download is more than 10MB and these albums can quickly become large with 20 images, even at 1600px and 72PPI. Clients will often need to accept an exception request on their phone allowing them to download the larger package and that’s an extra step for users not always familiar with the process.

On the plus side, there is no need to use the iTune Store or Google Play as the service uses HTML5 to deploy. This means no need to learn coding nor application to either service. Also, as the service will download images the first time a client clicks on their desktop icon and then caches it, opening after the first time is fairly quick for users. Even better, the albums can be updated by you on the website backend and the next time your client opens that album, it will grab the new images.

If you are a kids sports photographer, this can be a great tool. Imagine creating a ‘living’ album that starts off with an image of the teams season schedule. The next pictures are highlights from the latest game which can change each time you shoot the team. Or a “highlights reel” where you simply add new images of great catches or game wining shots and build the album as the season goes on. Even more so, you can create an album for each player on a basketball team, for instance, and then add photos of them in action each week simply by sorting by jersey number.

I have already used the service to deliver albums to previous wedding clients as a thank you and a friendly reminder that I still shoot weddings. It can also be used as an add-on for wedding photographers who want to charge for the download as an additional service. Many wedding photographers like to send a thank you on the one year anniversary of their clients’ weddings and this plays perfectly into that idea for connected clients.

Conclusion

With the Professional version of the site allowing for complete branding based with your company’s logo and contact info, StickyAlbums is an easy, out-of-the-box solution for photographers looking to get their images into the hands of their clients in a way clients will utilize over and over. The concept is simple; make it easy for your clients to show their friends how great of a photographer you are.

The app allows clients to share links via text message, email, Pinterest, Facebook or Twitter. It will also sense orientation and rotate images accordingly (tip: group your horizontal images together and your portrait images together so your clients don’t have to keep rotating their phone).

I like what I’ve found so far and plan on continue to use the service to help generate more referrals. I like that the images can not be copied directly (although any device allows screen shots).

If you would like to see a sample album, I have one of 30 images from my current ‘Best Of…” folder. Click on this link from your mobile device http://moblalbum.com/vlQw7rfYBo/gallery/30843 You can click on that link in a web browser from any machine and get a web-based version as well.

Post originally from: Digital Photography Tips.

Check out our more Photography Tips at Photography Tips for Beginners, Portrait Photography Tips and Wedding Photography Tips.

StickyAlbums Mobile Portfolios [REVIEW]

Dec
2

StickyAlbums Mobile Portfolios [REVIEW]

Filed Under Digital Photography Resources, Digital Photography School, Make Money From Photography, Portrait Photography, Post Production Tips, wedding photography

StickyAlbums is, at its heart, a tool for generating word-of-mouth referrals for professional photographers. As you will see in this review, the system is not set up for the casual photographer, as the free version is more of a means of introduction and trial than it is a full blown service, like gmail or Flickr.

StickyAlbums is a way to create a mobile portfolio of images, either in general or for a specific client. The creation of the portfolio takes place on stickyalbums.com and the viewing is optimized for mobile devices, such a tablets or smartphones. While the portfolios are known to be 100% compatible with iOS devices, not every single version of Android can be tested, although I was informed the app should work on just about any Droid phone or tablet.

Albums are created by uploading images to stickyalbums.com, creating a couple of splash pages, some simple formats and then delivery to clients. Clients will receive a link which will ask them if they want to download the album, which will show up as an ‘app’ on the desktop of their mobile device. From there, clients can browse, zoom and share albums. The service has basic features, like stats for number of downloads, and is ready for prime time, while still under development and improvement based on customer feedback.

Getting Started

Let me start by pointing out the free version is good for one album of 12 images as a trial.  If you want to skip this review and give it a try yourself, go to http://www.stickyalbums.com/pricing/. The next level up is a monthly subscription ($21/mo) which allows for use of youtube videos as well as images and lifetime hosting. The highest level offers everything the monthly subscription offers plus the option to use your own branding on albums, unlimited uploads, password protected albums and lifetime hosting of albums. It is appropriately called the “Professional” version and runs $189/year.

The basic process is this:

  • Pick a number of images for the album you want to create. The album shouldn’t be much more than 10-40 images because there is a 50MB download limit for most devices.
  • Resize the images to be 1600px on the long edge.
  • Now gather some special images. These will be a logo (rectangular), desktop icon and two splash screen, or ‘loading’ images. The loading images can be of anything and created using Photoshop to include your logo as well.
  • Start stepping through the album creation process where it will ask for your images, desktop icon, logo, email address, phone number, web address and loading pages.
  • Create the album and share!

I found the process to be easy once I ran through it a couple of times. It helps that logos and other info (my website, email, etc…) can be stored on the site for easy entry when creating an album.

I’m not going to give a step-by-step tutorial here because they already have a well organized page that describes how to arrange files and use the service to create an album. That can be found here http://www.stickyalbums.com/create-your-branding-files/

In The Real World

What it is like using StickyAlbums? With a recent upgrade to the site, it is easy and useful. Not that it wasn’t useful before, but some small issues with organizing images have been fixed and the ability to see basic stats (how many downloads) was added. The Professional version also allows for password protected albums.

How can you use StickyAlbums? If you are a pro, there are a number of ways. I have used it as a basic means to share images with clients, such as wedding clients, before and after delivery of final images. Brides with smartphones are an excellent market for this app as it place their wedding images in an easy to carry package to show friends. No need for your clients to save all the images and page through them inside their phone’s ‘Photos’ album. This product stands by itself as a desktop icon.

It can be used as a basic portfolio to send to connected clients. It can also be used as a promotional tool. For instance, let’s say you perform a studio shoot with a client, such as a high school senior. Inside the album you send to the senior and their parents you include 20 images from the shoot. Also included is an image you create in Photoshop that is a 20% off coupon for another shoot, complete with your phone number and email address, either for them or for a friend. Referrals are the lifeblood of many studio photographers and this app helps put your name and contact info right into the hands of your client when they are showing their friends how great they look during your studio shoot.

There is some downside to the app. It can become large, the downloads I mean. A lot of devices demand use of wifi if a download is more than 10MB and these albums can quickly become large with 20 images, even at 1600px and 72PPI. Clients will often need to accept an exception request on their phone allowing them to download the larger package and that’s an extra step for users not always familiar with the process.

On the plus side, there is no need to use the iTune Store or Google Play as the service uses HTML5 to deploy. This means no need to learn coding nor application to either service. Also, as the service will download images the first time a client clicks on their desktop icon and then caches it, opening after the first time is fairly quick for users. Even better, the albums can be updated by you on the website backend and the next time your client opens that album, it will grab the new images.

If you are a kids sports photographer, this can be a great tool. Imagine creating a ‘living’ album that starts off with an image of the teams season schedule. The next pictures are highlights from the latest game which can change each time you shoot the team. Or a “highlights reel” where you simply add new images of great catches or game wining shots and build the album as the season goes on. Even more so, you can create an album for each player on a basketball team, for instance, and then add photos of them in action each week simply by sorting by jersey number.

I have already used the service to deliver albums to previous wedding clients as a thank you and a friendly reminder that I still shoot weddings. It can also be used as an add-on for wedding photographers who want to charge for the download as an additional service. Many wedding photographers like to send a thank you on the one year anniversary of their clients’ weddings and this plays perfectly into that idea for connected clients.

Conclusion

With the Professional version of the site allowing for complete branding based with your company’s logo and contact info, StickyAlbums is an easy, out-of-the-box solution for photographers looking to get their images into the hands of their clients in a way clients will utilize over and over. The concept is simple; make it easy for your clients to show their friends how great of a photographer you are.

The app allows clients to share links via text message, email, Pinterest, Facebook or Twitter. It will also sense orientation and rotate images accordingly (tip: group your horizontal images together and your portrait images together so your clients don’t have to keep rotating their phone).

I like what I’ve found so far and plan on continue to use the service to help generate more referrals. I like that the images can not be copied directly (although any device allows screen shots).

If you would like to see a sample album, I have one of 30 images from my current ‘Best Of…” folder. Click on this link from your mobile device http://moblalbum.com/vlQw7rfYBo/gallery/30843 You can click on that link in a web browser from any machine and get a web-based version as well.

Post originally from: Digital Photography Tips.

Check out our more Photography Tips at Photography Tips for Beginners, Portrait Photography Tips and Wedding Photography Tips.

StickyAlbums Mobile Portfolios [REVIEW]


Mar
7

Want to Be a Professional Wedding Photographer? Here Are 10 Things You Should Know.

Filed Under Digital Photography School, Photography Tips and Tutorials, Portrait Photography, wedding photography

Wedding photography is joyful beyond description! In fact, it’s all the rage in the realm of digital photography, and you can turn a pretty penny as well! But professional wedding photography definitely isn’t for everyone. Here are 10 things you should know about being a professional wedding photographer, before you take the leap and quit your day job.

1.  Know Your Gear. 

I hate to even include this on this list, because it’s clearly a given. However, it bears repeating, and repeating (and repeating). If you plan to represent yourself as a professional, you need to have a professional level understanding of your gear. This may sound contradictory if you’ve read my post, Photographing Your Best Friend’s Wedding, so allow me to clarify. There is a significant difference between representing yourself as a professional VS setting clearly defined expectations and allowing a friend or family member to hire you with eyes WIDE open to your level of inexperience. If you’re going to market yourself as a professional, you’ve got to know your gear up, down and side to side.

That said— I BELIEVE IN YOU!!! Wholeheartedly! If you don’t know your gear YET, that doesn’t mean you can’t learn! If professional wedding (or portrait, or journalism, or travel, or commercial) photography is your goal, I say “Go for it!” I don’t care who you are, or where you come from, your goal can become your reality if you are willing to WORK for it!

2. Wedding Photography is Collaborative.

Remember, wedding photography is a collaborative effort between the photographer, the bride and groom, the planner, the parents, the guests, other vendors and more! You’ve got to understand this foundational information if you’re going to be successful. I’ll elaborate throughout the points below, but take this wisdom and let it sink into your core. It is essential to your success.

3.  Know Who You Work For.

You’ve got to know who you work for. Do you work for the bride? Do you work for her mother? Do you work for a planner? You’ve got to clearly understand (and articulate your understanding) to all the parties involved in the event. Generally speaking, at the end of the day, even if the referral came from a planner, you work for the bride, and SHE is the one you’re aiming to please. Meet her every need, with your whole soul, she deserves it. It’s her big day. . . Additionally, she’s the one signing your check. It pays to make her happy (pun unintended, but welcomed nonetheless).

Kellin and Sean’s beautiful wedding: Kona, Hi.

4.  Remember: Wedding Photography is Relationship Based.

Wedding photography is relationship based—referral based. You’ve simply got to over deliver, at every single event. This goes for delivery of self (more on that to come), images, correspondence, and final products. You hold the holy grail for these people: IMAGES! You are documenting their memories for a lifetime, and in terms of vendors, you are helping build their professional portfolio.

Share, give, collaborate, always.

NOTE: Above I mentioned knowing who you work for. Don’t mistake me to mean that you shouldn’t respect, revere and do your very best to accommodate a planner. They take on the lion’s share of the work involved in the wedding day. They’ve been working for months and months (sometimes a year or LONGER) putting all these beautiful details together. Offer them the respect they deserve. They are wonderful people (and have the potential to be wonderful resources to you as your progress as a photographer).

5.  Take Care of Yourself (yes, you heard me right).

As I mentioned above, and have continued to illustrate throughout this post, wedding photography is a collaborative effort. You’ve got to show up at your BEST—mentally, emotionally, physically and creatively. Make sure you’ve prepared the most important piece of gear you own: YOU! 

Show up as the best version of yourself, ready to work HARD, focus fiercely and listen carefully to ensure you anticipate the needs of your client completely.

6.  Be Prepared for the Time Commitment.

Wedding photography requires an astronomical amount of work. Yes, I know your mind flows directly to editing, and yes, that can be extremely time consuming, but I’m not referring only to post production. I’m referencing the booking process, the email correspondence, facilitating questions, managing expectations, shooting, editing, providing images and other products. You’re committing to being completely accessible to your client for MONTHS leading up to the event and months after the big day. Make sure you don’t over commit and thus find yourself less available to your clients. Remember, this industry is relationship based. The better care you take of your current clients, the more likely they are to refer you to their friends. I equate more than 80% of my business to past client referrals. That’s pretty darn significant. Wouldn’t you say?

7.  You’ve Got to Work to Refine Your Style.

Part of setting clearly defined expectations for your clients and collaborating effectively, is for you to have a clearly defined style—a clearly defined artistic voice. Heaven knows that this is an organic process and that you will constantly refine and re-refine yourself artistically, however your clients need to have clear expectations as to what they will receive from you. If you want to achieve consistent bookings from enthusiastic clients, who are willing to pay you fairly, you’ve got to present yourself to them consistently and effectively.

If you don’t do the work necessary to refine your style, this industry will soon become filled with a million “minis.” Minis are watered down versions of other photographers. This industry does not need a zillion photographers simply regurgitating each other’s work. This industry needs YOUR creative voice, YOUR unique vision. Refining your style lends itself to better clients—clients who you really resonate with, because they have hired YOU because you’re YOU! They love your unique style and want to work with you. You become a scarce commodity, rather than just another photographer, and while this isn’t the motivating end in mind, the truth of the matter is that it does make you worth more money. Yay!

8.  It’s Not Always as Glamorous as it Seems.

I vividly remember being on a flight to shoot my first celebrity wedding. I was 8 months pregnant, sitting in the back row of the plane, my seat didn’t recline, and I was nestled in between 2 fairly large gentlemen flyers. Not quite what I’d build that moment up to be! Ha!

Be prepared to WORK. Hard. It’s not all glamor and glitz. You’ve got to give your absolute ALL, to every single client, at every single wedding you shoot, ALWAYS. Don’t get jaded. Don’t lose your creative edge. Fight to stay in your best creative space (by caring for yourself as mentioned above). Each client deserves the VERY BEST you have to give—without exception!

My friend Gina and I, after a 10 hour wedding in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. Exhaustion.

9.  Don’t Be Discouraged By Rejection.

You’re not going to book every single client who sends you an inquiry. Get used to hearing “no.” It’s not an indication of your talent or lack there of. Not every client is “your client.” Remember, you’re not looking for every single client the world over, you want to find the RIGHT clients for you. The clients that you can really connect with and thus COLLABORATE with effectively toward your very best work. Remembering this, that you’re not looking for every client, just the right ones—helps you keep your head on your shoulders when you are inevitably turned down from time to time.

NOTE: If you ARE booking every client that comes your way, that’s a clear indication that it’s time to raise your prices! You should really only be booking approximately 50% of the inquiries that come your way.

10. Enjoy Every Minute of It!

You’re living a dream! Photographing weddings is such a joyful experience! Yes it’s tough, yes it’s WORK, but it’s completely and totally fulfilling as well. It’s absolutely worth any and all the sacrifices it requires in order to be an integral part of such a significant time in someone’s life. Every day, my clients remind me how to love . . . completely. Who could ask for anything more?!

Me, jowling in a wedding photo booth. Enjoying every minute of it! I love my job!

Happy shooting!

Post originally from: Digital Photography Tips.

Check out our more Photography Tips at Photography Tips for Beginners, Portrait Photography Tips and Wedding Photography Tips.

Want to Be a Professional Wedding Photographer? Here Are 10 Things You Should Know.


Mar
7

Want to Be a Professional Wedding Photographer? Here Are 10 Things You Should Know.

Filed Under Digital Photography School, Photography Tips and Tutorials, Portrait Photography, wedding photography

Wedding photography is joyful beyond description! In fact, it’s all the rage in the realm of digital photography, and you can turn a pretty penny as well! But professional wedding photography definitely isn’t for everyone. Here are 10 things you should know about being a professional wedding photographer, before you take the leap and quit your day job.

1.  Know Your Gear. 

I hate to even include this on this list, because it’s clearly a given. However, it bears repeating, and repeating (and repeating). If you plan to represent yourself as a professional, you need to have a professional level understanding of your gear. This may sound contradictory if you’ve read my post, Photographing Your Best Friend’s Wedding, so allow me to clarify. There is a significant difference between representing yourself as a professional VS setting clearly defined expectations and allowing a friend or family member to hire you with eyes WIDE open to your level of inexperience. If you’re going to market yourself as a professional, you’ve got to know your gear up, down and side to side.

That said— I BELIEVE IN YOU!!! Wholeheartedly! If you don’t know your gear YET, that doesn’t mean you can’t learn! If professional wedding (or portrait, or journalism, or travel, or commercial) photography is your goal, I say “Go for it!” I don’t care who you are, or where you come from, your goal can become your reality if you are willing to WORK for it!

2. Wedding Photography is Collaborative.

Remember, wedding photography is a collaborative effort between the photographer, the bride and groom, the planner, the parents, the guests, other vendors and more! You’ve got to understand this foundational information if you’re going to be successful. I’ll elaborate throughout the points below, but take this wisdom and let it sink into your core. It is essential to your success.

3.  Know Who You Work For.

You’ve got to know who you work for. Do you work for the bride? Do you work for her mother? Do you work for a planner? You’ve got to clearly understand (and articulate your understanding) to all the parties involved in the event. Generally speaking, at the end of the day, even if the referral came from a planner, you work for the bride, and SHE is the one you’re aiming to please. Meet her every need, with your whole soul, she deserves it. It’s her big day. . . Additionally, she’s the one signing your check. It pays to make her happy (pun unintended, but welcomed nonetheless).

Kellin and Sean’s beautiful wedding: Kona, Hi.

4.  Remember: Wedding Photography is Relationship Based.

Wedding photography is relationship based—referral based. You’ve simply got to over deliver, at every single event. This goes for delivery of self (more on that to come), images, correspondence, and final products. You hold the holy grail for these people: IMAGES! You are documenting their memories for a lifetime, and in terms of vendors, you are helping build their professional portfolio.

Share, give, collaborate, always.

NOTE: Above I mentioned knowing who you work for. Don’t mistake me to mean that you shouldn’t respect, revere and do your very best to accommodate a planner. They take on the lion’s share of the work involved in the wedding day. They’ve been working for months and months (sometimes a year or LONGER) putting all these beautiful details together. Offer them the respect they deserve. They are wonderful people (and have the potential to be wonderful resources to you as your progress as a photographer).

5.  Take Care of Yourself (yes, you heard me right).

As I mentioned above, and have continued to illustrate throughout this post, wedding photography is a collaborative effort. You’ve got to show up at your BEST—mentally, emotionally, physically and creatively. Make sure you’ve prepared the most important piece of gear you own: YOU! 

Show up as the best version of yourself, ready to work HARD, focus fiercely and listen carefully to ensure you anticipate the needs of your client completely.

6.  Be Prepared for the Time Commitment.

Wedding photography requires an astronomical amount of work. Yes, I know your mind flows directly to editing, and yes, that can be extremely time consuming, but I’m not referring only to post production. I’m referencing the booking process, the email correspondence, facilitating questions, managing expectations, shooting, editing, providing images and other products. You’re committing to being completely accessible to your client for MONTHS leading up to the event and months after the big day. Make sure you don’t over commit and thus find yourself less available to your clients. Remember, this industry is relationship based. The better care you take of your current clients, the more likely they are to refer you to their friends. I equate more than 80% of my business to past client referrals. That’s pretty darn significant. Wouldn’t you say?

7.  You’ve Got to Work to Refine Your Style.

Part of setting clearly defined expectations for your clients and collaborating effectively, is for you to have a clearly defined style—a clearly defined artistic voice. Heaven knows that this is an organic process and that you will constantly refine and re-refine yourself artistically, however your clients need to have clear expectations as to what they will receive from you. If you want to achieve consistent bookings from enthusiastic clients, who are willing to pay you fairly, you’ve got to present yourself to them consistently and effectively.

If you don’t do the work necessary to refine your style, this industry will soon become filled with a million “minis.” Minis are watered down versions of other photographers. This industry does not need a zillion photographers simply regurgitating each other’s work. This industry needs YOUR creative voice, YOUR unique vision. Refining your style lends itself to better clients—clients who you really resonate with, because they have hired YOU because you’re YOU! They love your unique style and want to work with you. You become a scarce commodity, rather than just another photographer, and while this isn’t the motivating end in mind, the truth of the matter is that it does make you worth more money. Yay!

8.  It’s Not Always as Glamorous as it Seems.

I vividly remember being on a flight to shoot my first celebrity wedding. I was 8 months pregnant, sitting in the back row of the plane, my seat didn’t recline, and I was nestled in between 2 fairly large gentlemen flyers. Not quite what I’d build that moment up to be! Ha!

Be prepared to WORK. Hard. It’s not all glamor and glitz. You’ve got to give your absolute ALL, to every single client, at every single wedding you shoot, ALWAYS. Don’t get jaded. Don’t lose your creative edge. Fight to stay in your best creative space (by caring for yourself as mentioned above). Each client deserves the VERY BEST you have to give—without exception!

My friend Gina and I, after a 10 hour wedding in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. Exhaustion.

9.  Don’t Be Discouraged By Rejection.

You’re not going to book every single client who sends you an inquiry. Get used to hearing “no.” It’s not an indication of your talent or lack there of. Not every client is “your client.” Remember, you’re not looking for every single client the world over, you want to find the RIGHT clients for you. The clients that you can really connect with and thus COLLABORATE with effectively toward your very best work. Remembering this, that you’re not looking for every client, just the right ones—helps you keep your head on your shoulders when you are inevitably turned down from time to time.

NOTE: If you ARE booking every client that comes your way, that’s a clear indication that it’s time to raise your prices! You should really only be booking approximately 50% of the inquiries that come your way.

10. Enjoy Every Minute of It!

You’re living a dream! Photographing weddings is such a joyful experience! Yes it’s tough, yes it’s WORK, but it’s completely and totally fulfilling as well. It’s absolutely worth any and all the sacrifices it requires in order to be an integral part of such a significant time in someone’s life. Every day, my clients remind me how to love . . . completely. Who could ask for anything more?!

Me, jowling in a wedding photo booth. Enjoying every minute of it! I love my job!

Happy shooting!

Post originally from: Digital Photography Tips.

Check out our more Photography Tips at Photography Tips for Beginners, Portrait Photography Tips and Wedding Photography Tips.

Want to Be a Professional Wedding Photographer? Here Are 10 Things You Should Know.


Feb
24

Seven Reasons to Let a Pro Take Your Pictures

Filed Under Digital Photography, Digital Photography Tips, wedding photography

As cameras became simple and dropped in price, everyone became an amateur photographer. Then digital photography took over and the average person can now take the pictures and print the results cheaper than they formerly let others do it. Yet, here are some reasons why being the chief photographer isn’t always best at all.

First, if you are the family photographer, you know the bondage it can be to always be looking for the ‘perfect shot’. If you’re going to be good at it, you must think like a photographer. Have you ever taken so much time to get a shot that you missed the event? Recently we got a call to watch a TV station to see our granddaughter in a parade. I retrieved the camera to record it but missed the moment the camera focused on her because I was fiddling with the camera. Sometimes, it’s best to just let others bother with all that so you can enjoy the event first hand.

It is true that, with all the electronics, cameras today can be very easy to use. However, the more ‘stuff’ a camera can do, the more there is to keep track of. What do all the icons on top mean? Do you know how to turn on or off the auto focus or flash? What does TV, P, M, or Av mean? Unless you use these features regularly, you will find it difficult to keep it all in your mind, and if you don’t the features are as good as missing from the camera.

As the photographer, you are often required to get into obtuse contortions or obnoxious places to get just the right shot. Further, you can lose a lot of friends by sticking the camera in their face every time they smile. When they don’t smile, you may need to almost bribe or shame them into posing. Why not let someone else be the bad guy for a change?

So let’s say you are the trusted photographer for some important event. Now as the hero others will be bothering you with requests for CDs of the shots, thinking you have lots of free time. Or they may be sending you an email asking you to post the pictures online or send them as attachments to your email.

It is not just a matter of time either. Online posting of digital photography is great, but some people can’t access it. For them you will need to buy photographic paper and lots of ink for your printer. Are you without a printer? In that case, make sure you get one that has six or more different color cartridges since you will be replacing each one often.

If you want to look touristy, you will if you have a camera hanging around your neck and you take plenty of pictures. Oh, and don’t be shocked if people are offended that your picture taking seems to be more important than they are.

If you have a small car repair problem, you probably fix it yourself. But if a major problem arises, you call a plumber to fix it. The same can be said of photography. Sure, keep your camera and take plenty of shots. But when a major event comes up, why don’t you get an expert to take the pictures and you just concentrate on enjoying yourself for a change.

When you want your photos done right, choosing the best photographer for your needs is worth the investment. If you follow the principles above, you will likely be glad you had it done professionally. Del Haven Studio is the location of an experienced [Virginia Beach Photographer|Virginia Beach Wedding Photographer|Virginia Beach Portrait Photographer|Virginia Beach Maternity Photographer] who is very skilled - as you can see from her website portfolio.

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Jan
23

How To Buy Low Budget Wedding Photography Packages For Your Wedding Day

Filed Under Digital Photography, Digital Photography Tips, wedding photography

One of the best marriage practices is the hiring of a marriage shutter-bug to finish a wedding photography package to document your special day. For most of the people, they’ll only experience marrying once in their lifetime and they want to have the memories of the day documented by marriage photography. Having the correct individual doing your marriage photography on your special day will go a great distance towards making the memories of the day that you wish.

Some of the most lovely examples of wedding photography are the posed shots that are used to document the big hitters in the marriage party and show how everyone looked on the special day. There are usually many shots of the bride alone in different poses, showing off her marriage dress from different angles and the expression on her face reflecting the contentment of the day. There might also be many shots of the bride and the groom together in different settings and locations to show their unity and how well they look together as a couple. In a number of cases, these posed photos are taken hours or maybe days before the rite.

Some of the posed shots for the wedding photography will be taken either just before or only after the genuine marriage rite. These photos include footage of the bride with her bridesmaids, the groom with his groomsmen, the couple at the altar, the couple with their mom and pop, and the entire marriage party together. Some folks opt to have their marriage photography taken before the rite so that everybody still is pristine with hair and makeup ready but some others opt to have the wedding photography conducted in the interlude between the marriage rite and the marriage reception.

When it comes to marriage photography, many of us like to have candid shots of their marriage too. Footage of the bride’s folks on the dance floor swaying to a love song or the grandparents of the groom holding hands as they hear the toasts offer an intimate look into the way the marriage of the couple has influenced the numerous folks around them. The candid shots might also be of the bride-to-be and groom in different positions,eg feeding each other marriage cake, raising their glasses in appreciation of a toast, or gazing into each other’s eyes. Wedding photography is a good way to catch the moments of the day and provide an obvious reminder that you can enjoy for many years yet to come.

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Dec
20

Wedding Photography in the Credit Crunch

Filed Under Digital Photography, Digital Photography Tips, wedding photography

The popularity of weddings seems to have increased in recent years, despite the decline in ‘traditional’ values. But the cost of a wedding can frequently cause a lot of misery both before and after the big day. Last year, the average US couple spent k on their wedding, with the average in the UK being far higher at a whopping £20k, or k. That’s probably the most expensive day you’ll ever have (unless you one day throw a winning lottery ticket in the wash). As the recession gets worse and job security declines, brides and grooms to be are become incresingly wary of such expensive weddings and are naturally looking for a cheaper way. Couples are cutting down guest lists, asking for friends and family to help out instead of hiring caterers, DJs and videographers, and brides are increasingly considering pre-worn wedding dresses. However when it comes to photography, most couples don’t want to go for a cheap option - and you can understand why. Of all the possible expenses you could lay out for your wedding day, its the photography that will stay with you and your family long after the others are just a hole in your bank account. Below are my top five tips on how to keep your wedding photography budget low, without compromising on quality.

 

1. Have faith in Google

The majority of modern wedding photographers have their own websites, and one of the most common ways of finding them is via search engines like Google. However since there are so many photographers jostling for space the problem is it can be easy to miss out on some great ones by not searching deeply enough. Don’t be content with just looking at Page 1 of the results or the first few sponsored listings. After a thorough search you should have put together a good list of photographers that you can now start comparing on price and style. Also don’t just go for the obvious search terms - make sure you vary your searches, and always include a few local areas and towns to find photographers who are slightly further afield but willing to travel. My wife and I live in Sussex, and when looking for our photographer we not only searched “Brighton Wedding Photographer” - we also looked at other surrounding areas such as Kent, Hampshire, London and Surrey.

 

2. Beware of Hidden Charges

Gone are the days when your wedding photographer had to develop their own prints in a darkroom - its all digital now. All of which has meant that wedding photographer prices have become a lot simpler. However believe it or not a lot of wedding photographer still work on a pay-per-print model, where couples have to choose which pictures they want and pay extra for them! Always look for photographers willing to give you all the images from the day on CD. Like this you can choose which prints you want to get done at leisure and get them printed for relatively low cost.

 

3. Albums and Extras: Do It Yourself!

With digital photography the era of the traditional wedding photo album has passed. These days contemporary wedding photography books are a big hit with most couples - but the problem is if you go through your photographer these will often cost you an arm and a leg. But if you can be bothered and have a flair for creative design, you can now design photobooks yourself using specialist software downloaded from the net, and get them printed up at ludicrously cheap rates. Ditto when it comes to canvas prints or blow up posters really - as long as you have high quality original image files from your photographer, you can pretty much do it all yourself!

 

4. Be Wary of Wedding Photography Scams

I have heard so many stories of unfortunate couples who have been taken in by unscrupulous con artists posing as wedding photographers. These swindlers will poach couples with cheap prices and slick sales pitches, receive their deposits or even full booking payments and then never be heard from again. It is a heartbreaking and cruel practice. The thing is, if you’re vigilant they’re pretty easy to spot and avoid. Make sure you pay any deposits via secure bank transfer as this can be traced in the event of a problem, and that you receive an invoice and receipt for your payment. And be sure to get a proper contract from the photographer which makes clear what you are getting and what you are paying for - this provides protection to the couple. And lastly, just make sure you have your radar up - try and visit the photographer, see lots of examples of his work and ask lots of questions.

 

5. Don’t Forget To Insist on Quality!

Now this one may sound counter-intuitive when it comes to ‘credit crunch weddings’ but I feel it’s an important one. In your quest to cut your wedding budget don’t go too far! As I said above, the photos are probably the most important part of the wedding day when you look back at it in years to come. In this world of ubiquitous DSLR cameras, wannabe photographers with little experience are ten a penny. Judging from their prices alone you’d think you’ve struck gold. But if you ignore the very cheapest prices that’s where you often find the best compromises between price and quality. Your photographer’s portfolio should always make you go “wow” - otherwise what’s the point of having a wedding photographer?

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Dec
20

Top Spots to Get Wedding Photography

Filed Under Digital Photography, Digital Photography Tips, wedding photography

A wedding is such a special time, most couples want it photographed professionally. After all, hopefully it is a once in a lifetime event so preserving it right is important! Some couples prefer to have their wedding pictures taken in a church or home or hall where the weather is not a factor. Others want the backdrop to depict the beauty of nature and, perhaps, their own personal interests as well.

If you want outdoor pictures of your wedding and live in the Virginia Beach area, then you are in luck. This area of far eastern Virginia has such a variety of possibilities that just about any couple would be satisfied with the choices.

The number one choice for outdoor wedding pictures in this area would be the beaches.  Situated at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, Virginia Beach has both bay and ocean beaches such as Baylake Beach, North Virginia Beach, and Sandbridge Beach. These and others provide many locations for a wedding party to pose with the ocean, piers, or sand dunes as a backdrop.

Twelve lighthouses stand along the shoes of Virginia Beach and many of these make a beautiful unique backdrop for wedding pictures. As an example, the original Cape Henry Lighthouse was built in 1792 but had to be replaced in 1881 because of cracks in the structure. In spite of this, both are still standing and awaiting the opportunity to be photographed with the happy couple.

Lynnhaven Bay intersects the city leaving much waterfront property with many beautiful homes along it. Hundreds of alcoves and dead end roads lead to forested waterfront and natural beauty. Some homeowners are flattered when a couple asks if their wedding pictures could be taken in their yard. Lake Smith reservoir further to the west also provides such opportune locations.

Another possible wedding backdrop would be one of the many beautiful public parks in Virginia Beach. Perhaps your photographer will recommend the best possibilities if you are not familiar with the area. A spring wedding could include the dazzling beauty of the flowering fruit trees at Brookdale Farm. Perhaps the wedding colors could be picked to match the blossoms, making a picture perfect scene.

History buffs may enjoy incorporating the historicity of Virginia Beach with their wedding theme. For example, Lynnhaven House in Virginia Beach was built in 1725 by Francis Thelaball II. Today it looks much the same as when it was constructed, even furnished with costumed interpreters. The Old Coast Guard Station, a 100 year-old building on the beach, also adds a unique flavor to the wedding pictures.

We have only scratched the surface of ideas for natural, beautiful background to wedding pictures. Each would add the uniqueness of Virginia Beach to the uniqueness of your wedding. Instead of being content with drab indoor pictures, why not consider adding Virginia Beach itself to your wedding pictures!

Applying these principles will have your wedding pictures be unforgettable. Ready to take action? Consider the services of Expressions Photography, an experienced Virginia Photographer. See their website portfolio for results.

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