Canon 1D X Mark III: Includes IBIS, Increased Resolution, and More

The post Canon 1D X Mark III: Includes IBIS, Increased Resolution, and More appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

Canon 1D X Mark III: Includes IBIS, Increased Resolution, and More

The Canon 1D X Mark III may be the last of its kind, but it won’t go down without a fight.

Information has leaked regarding the Canon flagship camera, predicting a 2020 release. This follows on the heels of Nikon’s D6 announcement and its claim that the D6 will be Nikon’s “most advanced DSLR to date.”

The Canon 1D X series and the Nikon D6 series have been longtime competitors, aimed at professional photographers in need of rugged, high-performing camera bodies. Hence, it’s no surprise that the 1D X Mark III should come out in 2020, most likely in time for the Summer Olympics in Tokyo.

The leak also suggests that the Canon 1D X Mark III will have in-body image stabilization (IBIS), a feature traditionally offered by mirrorless models but kept out of DSLRs. This will be appreciated by low-light shooters who need to eke out every bit of stability they can get.

The Canon 1D X Mark III is also said to feature significantly increased resolution “for an EOS-1 series camera.” Note that Canon’s EOS-1 line is short on resolution but high on autofocus capabilities and shooting speed, which explains why the 1D X Mark II tops out at 20.2 megapixels, despite its ‘flagship’ label.

What would count as significant?

My guess would be a jump in the 4-megapixel range, to put the 1D X Mark III at 24 megapixels. But it could be less, considering the low bar for 1D X resolution.

Apparently, the Canon flagship will also include 6K video (without a crop) and an upgraded DIGIC processor, as well as dual CFExpress card slots.

As of now, the 1D X Mark III is looking on par with the Nikon D6, which is rumored to drop in 2020.

Both cameras will undoubtedly be pricey; the Canon 1D X Mark II retails at $5500 USD, and the Nikon D5 sits at nearly $6000.

But for the professional action photographer, the cameras will undoubtedly be worth the cost.

Are you looking forward to the Canon 1D X Mark III announcement? What specs are you hoping to see? Share your thoughts in the comments!

The post Canon 1D X Mark III: Includes IBIS, Increased Resolution, and More appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

Canon to Produce an 80-Megapixel Mirrorless Camera

The post Canon to Produce an 80-Megapixel Mirrorless Camera appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

 

canon-80mp-cameraIf you’ve been hoping Canon will produce a high-resolution professional mirrorless camera, then you’re in luck.

Rumors that Canon has been working on a 70 or 80-megapixel mirrorless camera have been swirling for months, but several new pieces of information make it more likely than ever.

First, Canon has filed a patent for an 83-megapixel sensor, which may be at the heart of a new mirrorless camera body.

Second, someone claiming to have a prototype of the new camera has just revealed specs, including:

  • An 80-megapixel full-frame sensor
  • A larger viewfinder than the Canon EOS R
  • Dual SD card slots
  • A new joystick
  • A larger size than the Canon EOS R

If these details are accurate, then the new camera (dubbed the Canon EOS RS by Canon Rumors) will likely be a mirrorless replacement to the Canon 5DS/5DS R duo. The two DSLR cameras debuted in February of 2015, and Canon has failed to update them in the years since. Most notable about the two cameras are their sensors: 50.6 megapixels – the largest full-frame sensors in existence at the time.

The dual card slots will be a particularly welcome addition to the Canon EOS RS. Many professional photographers passed over the EOS R based on its single card slot, and it seems Canon got the message. So for photographers who require redundancy in their work, the Canon EOS RS will be a good choice.

And if the Canon EOS RS is truly 80+ megapixels, commercial photographers will appreciate the opportunity to push resolution to its limits.

Such a high-resolution sensor has its drawbacks, however. The larger the files, the faster you’ll fill up space. Plus, a sensor with 80 megapixels will have high pixel density, leading to small pixels. This can be a problem with regard to noise production: the smaller pixels are more likely to produce noise at high ISOs.

Let’s just hope that Canon puts out a high-quality sensor to complement the megapixel count! If you’re a Canon fan looking to make the change to mirrorless, then keep an eye out for news on the Canon EOS RS, which will likely be announced at the start of 2020.

Would you purchase the Canon EOS RS for its 80+ megapixels? Share your thoughts with us in the comments.

The post Canon to Produce an 80-Megapixel Mirrorless Camera appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

Canon Announces Two New RF Lenses: The 15-35mm and the 24-70mm

The post Canon Announces Two New RF Lenses: The 15-35mm and the 24-70mm appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

Canon Announces Two New RF Lenses: The 15-35mm and the 24-70mm

Canon has just announced two more lenses for their RF lineup: the RF 15-35mm f/2.8L IS and the RF 24-70mm f/2.8L IS.

Note that the RF line is designed for Canon’s full-frame mirrorless bodies, which currently includes the Canon EOS R and the Canon EOS RP. This is excellent news for Canon mirrorless users, who have previously had to contend with Canon’s relatively weak mirrorless lens lineup.

So if you’re a Canon mirrorless fan, this is for you.

These two lenses were unveiled by Canon back in February. But we now have specifications, prices, and release dates to share.

The Canon RF 15-35mm f/2.8L IS

If you’re a landscape photographer, you’ll undoubtedly appreciate a high-quality wide zoom such as the Canon 15-35mm f/2.8L IS.

Canon Announces Two New RF Lenses: The 15-35mm and the 24-70mm

The focal length is perfect for a mix of wide and ultra-wide landscapes, and the image stabilization makes it possible to handhold photos, even with a deep depth of field.

Plus, the image quality is bound to be stellar.

This lens could easily become a landscape photography workhorse. It could also make its way into the bags of wedding photographers who are looking for a high-performing wide zoom.

The Canon RF 15-35mm f/2.8L IS will be sold for $2,299 USD starting at the end of September. While the price isn’t cheap, serious landscape photographers will appreciate the focal length, the optical quality, and the image stabilization.

The Canon RF 24-70mm f/2.8L IS USM

Compared to the 15-35mm, the 24-70mm is more of an all-around option and one that’ll hold its own with the best in the field.

Canon Announces Two New RF Lenses: The 15-35mm and the 24-70mm

First, the wide maximum aperture and standard zoom focal length make this lens a good choice for portraits. The 9-bladed aperture is also bound to produce some gorgeous bokeh. So for portrait photographers, this is a lens worth looking at.

Event photographers will also appreciate the fast aperture, while the 5-stop image stabilization will make handholding in low light easy to pull off.

Even landscape photographers should consider the 24-70mm f/2.8. For landscape photographers who like a tighter look, the 24-70mm focal length range is exactly what is needed.

The Canon RF 24-70mm f/2.8L IS USM will start shipping at the end of September for $2,299 USD.

Conclusion

If you’re a mirrorless landscape photographer, then this is a good day, because you’ve got two amazing new RF lenses to look forward to.

Same goes for portrait and event photographers, who should appreciate the image stabilization and fast apertures these two lenses bring to the table.

If this is a sign of things to come, then the future is bright.

What do you think about these new lenses? Will you purchase them when the come out? Share in the comments!

The post Canon Announces Two New RF Lenses: The 15-35mm and the 24-70mm appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

The Canon 90D Unveiled Through Leaked Promo Video

The post The Canon 90D Unveiled Through Leaked Promo Video appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

After months of rumors and speculation surrounding Canon’s new DSLR offerings, we finally have something certain to report:

The specs of the Canon 90D, as indicated by a promotional video leaked from Canon.

The Canon 90D Unveiled Through Leaked Promo Video

If you’re a Canon user, you’re going to want to pay attention. Because the Canon 90D is a seriously impressive piece of kit, one that seems to be a combination of the Canon 80D line and the Canon 7D line, and one that will carry on many of the best features from both camera lineups.

Here’s the promotional video in full:

 

Now, what’s so special about the Canon 90D?

First, the resolution is bound to impress: The 90D is slated to have a 32.5-megapixel sensor, which is a huge step up from both the Canon 80D (at 24.2 MP) and the Canon 7D Mark II (at 20.2 MP). The increased megapixel count means increased crop capabilities and an increased potential for large prints.

High megapixel counts usually result in slower continuous shooting. But not for the 90D, which fires off 10 frames per second. This is enough for any type of action photography: sports, wildlife, bird, and more. Plus, the Canon 90D features 45 autofocus points, all of which are cross-type. Together, these features should be a potent combination in the hands of a dedicated photographer.

Add to this 100% viewfinder coverage, impressive battery life of 1300 photos, and an articulating screen, and you’ve got yourself a winner. You should also remember that the Canon 90D will offer dual pixel autofocus, which practically guarantees fast and efficient focus while using Live View.

Who should get the Canon 90D?

I’d recommend grabbing the Canon 90D if you’re a hobbyist or semi-professional photographer. Better yet, you should be interested in action photography of any kind. The strong autofocus and 10-fps continuous shooting is too impressive not to pass up.

Plus, if you’re looking for a bit of a megapixel boost compared to an older Canon, the 90D is the way to go.

Now I’d like to ask you:

What do you think of the Canon 90D? Will you be looking to purchase it? And what are your favorite Canon 90D features?

Let me know in the comments!

The post The Canon 90D Unveiled Through Leaked Promo Video appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

Canon May Produce an Unprecedented 50-80mm f/1.1 Lens

The post Canon May Produce an Unprecedented 50-80mm f/1.1 Lens appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

Canon May Produce an Unprecedented 50-80mm f/1.1 Lens

Are you a Canon user?

If so, you’ll be happy to know that Canon continues to push the boundaries of camera gear innovation.

Because earlier this month, a Canon patent was published, one that detailed plans for a new lens: a 50-80mm f/1.1 zoom.

Yes, you read that right.

According to the Canon patent, the lens would have a fixed maximum aperture across its entire focal length range, maintaining its f/1.1 maximum aperture from 50mm to 80mm.

A fixed-aperture f/1.1 Canon lens would certainly make waves. None of Canon’s recent lenses have an f/1.1 aperture. The closest lens is the Canon 50mm f/1.2. So this lens will certainly appeal to those who enjoy unique equipment.

The f/1.1 aperture would be ideal for portrait photographers. The wide aperture would allow for stunning background bokeh. And it would also allow for photography in low light, which is perfect for those who shoot indoors or at night.

Plus, the 50-80mm focal length is great for portrait photography of any kind. At 50mm, portrait photographers can get some standard shots. At 80mm, you can go in for a tighter image.

Street photographers will also be a fan of 50-80mm, given how 50mm is often considered the fundamental street photography focal length.

A zoom lens such as this one would likely exist as part of Canon’s RF lineup, which is rumored to expand over the course of the next year.

Note that some patents never actually amount to anything. In other words, just because Canon patents the designs doesn’t mean that they will send the product to market. But it’s interesting to see Canon thinking about such incredible new equipment.

So keep your eyes peeled, Canon users.

And even if the Canon 50-80mm f/1.1 lens is never produced, it’s certainly piqued consumers’ imaginations!

Would you be interested in a lens like this one? What do you like and dislike about it? What would you use it for? Let me know in the comments!

The post Canon May Produce an Unprecedented 50-80mm f/1.1 Lens appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

Your Canon DSLR Might Be Hacked; Here’s What You Should Do

The post Your Canon DSLR Might Be Hacked; Here’s What You Should Do appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

canon-dslr-ransomwareDo you use a Canon DSLR?

If so, watch out. Because hackers can exploit your camera and hold your images hostage.

Seriously.

Let me explain:

Ransomware is malicious software that hackers can use to infect your camera. Once the ransomware gains access to your camera, it encrypts your images, making them completely inaccessible to you.

That’s when the hacker makes a demand:

If you ever want to see your photos again, you must pay a sum of money. In return, the hacker will give you an encryption key, which allows you to break the encryption and access your images.

In other words:

The hacker holds your images hostage. And if you want them back, you have to pay the ransom.

For some, ransomware might not be news. Ransomware attacks have been going on for decades.

Except it was only this year that a company called CheckPoint demonstrated the hackability of Canon cameras. CheckPoint realized that Canon’s Picture Transfer Protocol (PTP) could be easily exploited by hackers through a USB connection or, more disturbingly, over Wi-Fi.

Then CheckPoint carried out a ransomware attack on a Canon 80D, and they did it over the camera’s Wi-Fi connection. The attack required absolutely no interaction with the camera owner.

CheckPoint shared their findings with Canon, prompting the company to produce a security advisory that warns consumers of the dangers of a “third-party attack.” Read the full security advisory on the Canon website.

Canon is now working hard on a patch for this vulnerability and has already produced a firmware update for the Canon 80D.

Meanwhile, Canon has released recommendations for other camera users:

  • Ensure the suitability of security-related settings of the devices connected to the camera, such as the PC, mobile device, and router being used.
  • Do not connect the camera to a PC or mobile device that is being used in an unsecure network, such as in a free Wi-Fi environment.
  • Do not connect the camera to a PC or mobile device that is potentially exposed to virus infections.
  • Disable the camera’s network functions when they are not being used.
  • Download the official firmware from Canon’s website when performing a camera firmware update.

So for owners of the Canon 80D, I suggest you update your camera. You don’t want to remain vulnerable.

And for anyone else with a Canon camera, keep an eye out for Canon firmware updates. This is especially critical if your camera features a Wi-Fi connection, which can be exploited much more easily than a USB connection.

Do you own a Canon with a wif-fi connection? Will you be updating your firmware?

The post Your Canon DSLR Might Be Hacked; Here’s What You Should Do appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

Canon and Nikon Will Release DSLRs With In-Body Image Stabilization

The post Canon and Nikon Will Release DSLRs With In-Body Image Stabilization appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

canon-nikon-IBIS

In-body image stabilization (IBIS) has long been resisted by the two DSLR giants, Nikon and Canon.

But recent rumors indicate that both Canon and Nikon will be breaking into new territory, with IBIS technology added to upcoming DSLRs for both brands.

Up until now, in-body image stabilization has been confined to Nikon’s mirrorless lineup. And while reports indicate that the followup to the (mirrorless) Canon EOS R will include IBIS, there was no definitive information about DSLR in-body stabilization.

Then, in April, rumors indicated that Nikon would be introducing in-body image stabilization to the D6, Nikon’s future flagship DSLR (with a possible release date in the first half of 2020). This was followed by further reports that the D6 was delayed due to the decision to add in-body image stabilization.

And just last week, Canon Rumors reported that “Canon will ‘definitely’ bring IBIS to ‘select’ DSLRs in the near future.”

Canon Rumors was uncertain “which camera(s) would be getting IBIS,” but explained that “the EOS 90D, which is coming in the next couple of months,” is a strong possibility.

Sources have also discussed the possibility that the Canon 1DX Mark III will have in-body image stabilization, so it can go toe-to-toe with the upcoming Nikon D6. Both the Canon 1DX bodies and the Nikon D6 bodies are direct competitors, catering to professional photographers who require high frame rates and exceptional durability.

Now, Nikon and Canon have always maintained that lens stabilization is superior to in-body image stabilization, due to increased flexibility in the lens as compared to the camera body. This may well be true, but many phenomenal Canon and Nikon lenses don’t include image stabilization. So photographers of all levels will undoubtedly appreciate this move to in-body stabilization.

It will certainly be a boon to those who tend to shoot handheld in low light.

So let me ask you:

Are you excited about the possibility of IBIS in new Canon and Nikon DSLRs?

And would you like to see IBIS in the upcoming Canon 90D?

Let me know in the comments!

The post Canon and Nikon Will Release DSLRs With In-Body Image Stabilization appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

Canon to Announce the 90D or the EOS M5 Mark II Next Month

The post Canon to Announce the 90D or the EOS M5 Mark II Next Month appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

canon-camera-announcement

August is bound to be an exciting month for Canon fans.

Rumors indicate that either the Canon 90D or the Canon EOS M5 Mark II will be announced next month, though it is also possible that we’ll get an announcement for both.

The Canon 90D would likely be the replacement for the Canon 80D, a mid-level Canon DSLR aimed at enthusiasts. The Canon EOS M5 Mark II, meanwhile, replaces the Canon EOS M5, an APS-C mirrorless camera.

The Canon 80D debuted back in February of 2016, and a lot has changed since then in the camera world. For one, the 80D lacks 4K video, and Canon fans expect to see this featured in a new 90D. Recent speculation suggests that the 90D may also be the first Canon DSLR to contain in-body image stabilization (IBIS).

Here are several rumored Canon 90D specifications:

  • A 31.2 (or a 32.5) megapixel APS-C sensor
  • 10 frames-per-second continuous shooting
  • 4K video
  • Dual card slots
  • Bluetooth
  • Wi-Fi
  • An articulating 3.2-inch LCD
  • 45 autofocus points
  • $1399 USD price

Note the 30+ megapixel sensor, which will take Canon APS-C cameras to a new level. And the dual card slots point to this being a slightly higher-end body than the Canon 80D.

The Canon 90D may not be replacing only the Canon 80D, however. Canon 7D Mark II fans have long awaited a 7D Mark III, but may have to settle with a Canon 80D/Canon 7D Mark II replacement hybrid, which will combine both APS-C camera lines into one.

The Canon M5 Mark II, on the other hand, would be an upgraded APS-C mirrorless body. It’s rumored to have an electronic viewfinder like the Canon RP, and enhanced video capabilities, including 4K and high frame-rate slow motion.

Note that the Canon EOS M6, another Canon APS-C mirrorless body, may also see a replacement announced sometime late next month.

Now I’d like to ask you:

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Let me know why in the comments!

The post Canon to Announce the 90D or the EOS M5 Mark II Next Month appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

Massive Decline in Digital Camera Sales, Plus Nikon Sees Market Share Decrease

The post Massive Decline in Digital Camera Sales, Plus Nikon Sees Market Share Decrease appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

Earlier this week, Nikkei revealed the latest digital camera market trends.

And for camera manufacturers, things are looking dismal.

The market share breakdown

First, let’s take a look at the market share breakdown:

  • Canon: 40.5% (an increase of 3.9% from 2017)
  • Nikon: 19.1% (a decrease of 2.7%)
  • Sony: 17.7% (a decrease of 0.7%)
  • Fujifilm: 5.1% (an increase of 1.3%)
  • Olympus: 2.8% (an increase of 0.1%)

Notice that Canon had the biggest gains, followed by Fujifilm and Olympus. Nikon’s market share took the biggest hit, with Sony seeing a decrease, as well.

For Nikon, these numbers are not encouraging. The 2.7% drop in market share suggests the company’s latest big move – its leap into the full-frame mirrorless market – hasn’t held up well against the competition.

In some ways, this might be expected. Nikon is a small company compared to competitors such as Canon and Sony, and this puts a clear cap on its resources for innovation. On the other hand, Nikon has remained a dominant player in the digital camera market for decades.

Which begs the question:

Are we about to see Nikon losing its footing?

Unfortunately for Nikon and the other camera manufacturers, the bigger problem has little to do with reshuffled market shares, and everything to do with surging smartphone camera technology.

Because, as Nikkei’s report revealed, digital camera unit sales are down 22% from 2017.

This may come as a surprise to some, who see mirrorless cameras representing the future of photography. After all, mirrorless camera innovation is at an all-time high, with Canon and Nikon just recently joining the fray.

But here’s the issue:

As impressive as mirrorless cameras have become, smartphone cameras are still far more attractive – at least for the casual photographer. They’re smaller than the smallest mirrorless body. You always have them with you. And the simple camera interface, bolstered by features such as ‘swipe to change the exposure,’ make smartphone photography an extremely enticing option.

So in the wake of smartphone camera improvements, would-be DSLR and mirrorless photographers are consistently turning to companies like Google and Apple to satisfy their photography needs.

And it’s a trend we’re likely to see into the future.

So now I’d love your input:

  • Do you think that smartphones will completely replace hobbyist digital cameras?
  • Could you see yourself using a smartphone camera instead of a DSLR or mirrorless body?
  • What do you think about Nikon’s decline and Canon’s rise?

POLL

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll.

The post Massive Decline in Digital Camera Sales, Plus Nikon Sees Market Share Decrease appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

Writer’s Favorite Lens – the Canon 40mm Pancake Lens

Like many beginning photographers, I’ve been a long-time fan of zoom lenses throughout much of my four year photography career. This past year, however, something in my brain shifted and I began to first accumulate and suddenly prefer using prime lenses. I began with the humble Canon 50mm f/1.8, eventually adding a 100mm f/2.8 macro lens. For many months, this combination of lenses paired with my Canon 6D became my preferred travel photography kit, replacing my beloved 16-35mm f/2.8. I loved the compact, significantly lighter kit that I was now able to tote around in my discrete Kata DSC 437 camera bag.

DPS 08

Several weeks ago, I decided to pull the trigger on another prime lens: the Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM pancake lens. Announced by Canon in June 2012, this is a relatively new lens and is the smallest ever made by Canon. Intrigued by its smaller size and slightly wider focal length, I decided to use it in place of my nifty fifty lens on a two week trip to New York and Montreal. The resulting images I took and overall experience shooting with the 40mm have secured it as my favorite new all-around shooting lens. Here are some reasons why you too may want to consider adding the 40mm pancake lens to your collection.

DPS Pancake lens 03

Makes DSLR cameras even more compact

At 22mm (0.86″) deep, the 40mm is significantly shorter than the 50mm f/1.8, which measures 41mm (1.6″) deep. The 40mm’s shortened length makes it easy to slip it into a relatively small camera bag, or even a medium sized purse.

DPS Pancake lens 02

Allows for the “perfect normal” focal length for full-frame cameras at a reasonable price

While the 40mm will work on every Canon DSLR ever made, it is optimized for use on full-frame digital cameras. I always found 50mm to be slightly too long for most of the casual street photography or travel shots that I want to take, and Canon doesn’t make a 35mm for less than $500. Priced brand new at $199.99, the 40mm is the perfect balance in terms of focal length and cost, providing an incredibly natural perspective to images at a reasonable cost.

DPS FINAL 05

Solidly built with instant manual focus override

Despite being drastically shorter than the 50mm f/1.8, the 40mm actually weighs about the same at 4.6 ounces (130 grams). This is likely due to the 40mm being constructed of both metal and plastic, giving it a very solid and secure feel, especially when compared to the mostly plastic 50mm f/1.8. Like the 50mm f/1.4, the 40mm also has an outer focus ring that can be adjusted at any time for instant manual-focus override when shooting in Canon’s One Shot focus mode.

DPS New York Food

Ideal for street, architectural, and food photography

The 40mm’s compact build makes it very easy to stow in casual bags of nearly any size. Its size also makes it more inconspicuous, making it ideal for street or documentary photography, as opposed to the popular 24-70 f/2.8 lens, which always seems to stick out. My travels through New York and Montreal saw many tall buildings and skyscrapers which were admittedly harder to shoot with the 40mm, making me miss my wider 16-35mm.

DPS FINAL 02

However, the 40mm was still wide enough to capture certain architectural scenes, and the benefit was the lack of distortion when captured at 40mm versus 16mm. This meant far less lens correction in post-processing. Another area of photography that is immensely easier with the 40mm is food and drink photography for the casual shooter.

DPS New York Food

If you want to make less of a show of grabbing a few snaps of a dish while being seated at a restaurant, the 40mm’s wider focal length and minimum focusing distance of 0.3m (11.8″)  – compared to 0.45m (17.7″) on the 50mm f/1.8 – is perfect for capturing what is immediately in front of you without having to stand up and fuss with angles.

DPS Portrait 02

The One Downside to Having a Pancake Lens

Throughout my three weeks of shooting with the 40mm, I had only one minor complaint that to me is the compromise of having a slimmer lens: lack of space to properly handle the lens during lens changes. It is much harder to attempt spur of the moment lens changes without accidentally getting fingerprints on one side of the lens or potentially dropping it.

Do you have a favorite lens? Have you tried this little gem? Share your thoughts in the comments.

The post Writer’s Favorite Lens – the Canon 40mm Pancake Lens by Suzi Pratt appeared first on Digital Photography School.

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