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Archive for December, 2017


Top Street and Travel Photography Tips 2017

Filed Under Digital Photography School, Photography Tips and Tutorials

If you’ve been reading over the last few of days you may have seen these already:

Top Street Photography Tips 2017

  1. The Ultimate Guide to Street Photography
  2. What are the Best Street Photography Camera Settings and Why
  3. How to Conquer the Biggest Fear in Street Photography
  4. Tutorial – Easy Camera Settings for Street Photography
  5. 7 Vital Tips to Improve Your Candid Street Photography
  6. 6 Reasons Why You Should Use a Standard Lens for Street Photography
  7. The Pros and Cons of Black and White Versus Color for Street and Travel Photography
  8. 7 Tips for Capturing the Decisive Moment in Street Photography
  9. How to Tell a Story With Your Street Photography
  10. 5 Tips for Photographing Street Portraits

Top Travel Photography Tips 2017

  1. 6 Reasons Why Your Travel Photos Don’t Look Like the Ones in Magazines
  2. 7 Non-Photography Items Which No Travel Photographer Should Leave Home Without
  3. 6 Practical Tips to Instantly Make Travel Photography Easier
  4. 7 Travel Photography Tips I’ve Learned from People in the Industry
  5. 8 Travel Photography Tips for Your Next Journey
  6. 10 Quick Tips for Travel Photography
  7. How to Backup and Manage Your Photos When Traveling Without a Computer
  8. How to Shoot Engaging Travel Portraits from Start to Finish
  9. How to Plan a Street Photography Shoot When Traveling
  10. Tips for Taking Documentary Style Travel Photos
  11. 7 Realities That Hit Once You Become a Professional Travel Photographer

The post Top Street and Travel Photography Tips 2017 by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.


2017 in review: a look back at December

Filed Under News: Digital Photography Review

December brings with it colder weather and early much-too-early sunsets (at least here in Seattle), as well as a chance to look back on the last twelve months. 2017 saw the continued rise of the smartphone coupled with uncertainty in the interchangeable lens and compact camera market. Will there be fewer camera manufacturers a year from now? We'll find out soon enough.

As you might imagine, December a quiet month for camera announcements. Information about the next generation of smartphones started to trickle out, including news of the upcoming Snapdragon 845 processor and the Huawei P11, which may feature three cameras. December also marked the arrival of the iMac Pro that, fully loaded, will set you back more than $13,000. Speaking of Apple, Final Cut Pro X received a much-needed update, adding HDR, VR and curves support.

2017 saw the continued rise of the smartphone coupled with uncertainty in the interchangeable lens and compact camera market

The end of the year brings with it lots of "best of" competitions, and some like National Geographic's Nature Photographer of the Year, Sony World Photography Awards and the always entertaining Comedy Wildlife awards are worth a look. We joined the competition parade and shared our favorite products of the year, which were drawn from our latest Buying Guides. We also pitted the Nikon D850 against the Sony a7R III and compared the portrait modes of the Google Pixel 2 and Apple iPhone X.

For those seeking more pretty pictures, we posted galleries for the Olympus 45mm and 17mm F1.2 Pro lenses, the Rokinon AF 50mm F1.4 FE and, naturally, the iPhone X. We also cranked out two reviews, of the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III and G9 X Mark II.

See all December content

Leica, Leica, Leica

In addition to announcing a special red edition of its M (Typ 262) body, the company also reported a 6% increase in revenue compared to the last fiscal year.

Read more about the red Leica M

Read more about Leica's earnings

And, in drone news...

December was a busy month for drone regulation. In a not very surprising move, the Federal Aviation Administration banned drone usage near US nuclear facilities. Over in Holland, the country's drone-catching eagles are being retired due to a lack of demand and training difficulties. A shame, since that would've been fun to watch.

Read more about new FAA regulations

Read more about drone-catching eagles

Canon EOS 7D Mark III on the way? (Of course!)

The rumor mill is buzzing about an update to Canon's venerable EOS 7D series of APS-C DSLRs. Rumor website CanonWatch says that the third revision is coming before next summer, which even if the rumor itself isn't based on any solid facts, still seems like a pretty safe bet. We made a wish list of what we'd like to see in the next 7D, as well.

Read more about Canon 7D Mark III rumors

Photographing the Northern Lights

Photographer and DPReview contributor José Francisco Salgado teamed up with our own Dale Baskin to share tips on how to capture this amazing phenomenon.

Read full article


Happy New Year 2018 – Recap of our Ultimate Guides to Photography

Filed Under Digital Photography School, Photography Tips and Tutorials

Wishing you the happiest new year from the dPS family.

As a bonus, here is a summary of some amazing ultimate guides we published in 2017. Each is available as a free PDF – just click on the ones you want to download below.

Enjoy and please share this page with your friends if you find these valuable!

The post Happy New Year 2018 – Recap of our Ultimate Guides to Photography by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.


Reviews and Articles on Photography Gear – 2017

Filed Under Cameras and Equipment, Digital Photography School

If you’ve been reading over the last few of days you may have seen these already:

Now it’s time to geek out a bit and talk about photography equipment. Here are some of the reviews and tips from 2017 to help you make the best of your gear.

Reviews and Articles on Photography Gear – 2017

  1. Review of the New Sigma 500mm F4 DG HSM OS Sport Lens
  2. Review of the New Flagship DX Camera – The Nikon D500
  3. Review of the New Formatt Hitech Firecrest Filter Holder and Neutral Density Filters
  4. Review of the Wine Country Camera Filter Holder System
  5. Review of the Sigma 85mm f/1.4 Art Lens
  6. Review of the New Nikon D5600 Camera Body
  7. Review of the Sigma 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art Lens
  8. Camera Bag Review – The Udee Backpack
  9. Review: Sigma 100-400mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary Lens
  10. Think Tank Signature 13 Camera Shoulder Bag Review
  11. The New Canon 6D Mark II – Hands-On Previews and Thoughts
  12. Review of the K&F Concept TC2534 Lightweight Carbon Fiber Tripod
  13. Review of the new Spekular Modular LED Light System
  14. VSGO Camera Sensor Cleaning Kit Review
  15. Eight Ways to Get Rid of GAS – Gear Acquisition Syndrome
  16. When is the Right Time to Upgrade Camera Gear?
  17. Tips for Buying Used Camera Gear
  18. Recommended Gear for Doing Long Exposure Photography at Twilight and Dusk
  19. DIY Hack 2-for-1 Luggage and Camera Roller Bag

The post Reviews and Articles on Photography Gear – 2017 by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.


2017 in review: a look back at November

Filed Under News: Digital Photography Review

This shot from Dan's Gear of the Year writeup wasn't taken in November but it seemed apt for an overview article.

November is usually a fairly quiet time for the industry: all the cameras the manufacturers are hoping will sell around Christmas have been announced. Well, except for Leica, which always likes to set itself apart - this time by launching a new model in mid November. Still, there was plenty going on in the wider world of photography:

The internet has always made rather more liberal use of other people's images than is legally allowed but it's generally only the egregious examples that tend to get pursued. US TV network CBS bucked that trend by going after a photographer who'd used a screengrab from a forty-year old TV show on social media. Meanwhile, another photographer took action against pop star Bruno Mars for using one of her photos on social media without seeking the appropriate license.

The UK's National Air Traffic Service published a video showing the knock-on effects of breaching drone rules

Speaking of licenses, the UK's National Air Traffic Service published a video showing the knock-on effects of breaching drone rules, after four planes and their passengers were diverted to other airports in response to one incidence of careless droning. It's probably no surprise that tighter rules may be implemented in the UK, and that DJI has the ability to track its drones.

Meanwhile Eastman Kodak announced more job losses, just four years after a bankruptcy restructuring that saw it exit the photography market. However, at the same time, the company also gave an insight into the work it's doing to recreate its Ektachrome filmstock.

But, just because all the camera makers were able to put their feet up until after Christmas*, that didn't mean we could do the same. Instead, we worked to test and evaluate the a7R III and put together the best-informed review we could, only for it to really complicate our Gear of the Year and DPR Award choices. But those are a topic for next month...

* I mean, I'm pretty sure that's what happens.

Sony a7R III review

We put a lot of effort digging into the a7R III's performance. The sensor was common to both this camera and the Mark II but enough changes had been made that we wanted to make sure we'd experienced and captured those differences and improvements. And what improvements...

A first look at the Leica CL

The Leica T and TL series cameras have tended to split opinion, with their minimalist design and touchscreen interfaces. The CL is a much safer product, though: traditional controls and pared-down classic styling. Barney took a closer look.

Canon 85mm F1.4L IS USM

An 85mm F1.4 has long been one of the glaring omissions from Canon's lens lineup. Not content to just fill that gap, Canon decided to make an image stabilized version worthy of its 'L' designation. As you can imagine, we were pretty excited to get out shooting with it.

New Fujifilm Raw-conversion software

Fujifilm released a Raw converter but one with a difference: all the processing is done by the camera.

Take a closer look


Grand Canyon time lapse records rare cloud inversion

Filed Under News: Digital Photography Review

In search of some tranquility on this last Friday before 2018? Well, Skyglow project collaborators Gavin Heffernan (of Sun Chaser Pictures) and Harun Mehmedinovic have just the video for you. They captured remarkable time-lapse footage of a cloud inversion in Arizona's Grand Canyon. This event occurs when an upper layer of warm air traps the cold air in the canyon, and the canyon fills with rolling fog and clouds for a spectacular sight.

Turn down the lights and experience a few minutes of peaceful clouds that are reminiscent of ocean waves - and don't forget to turn up your headphones for the full effect.

Via: Laughing Squid


Selfitis, the obsessive taking of selfies, may be a real mental disorder

Filed Under News: Digital Photography Review

A viral article published in 2014 claimed that the American Psychiatric Association had established a new mental disorder called "selfitis" -- that is, the obsessive taking of selfies. That article, though fake, inspired a real exploratory study to determine whether a condition like the one described in the article could exist...and, the research shows, it very well may.

Of note, the fake viral article had claimed that selfitis existed across three levels of severity: borderline, acute, and chronic. To determine whether that could be true, researchers Mark D. Griffiths and Janarthanan Balakrishnan conducted interviews with a focus group of 225 Indian university students to attempt to create what they called the Selfitis Behavior Scale (SBS) based on those three severities.

Having created the SBS, and as explained in the recently published study, the researchers then attempted to validate it using exploratory factor analysis (EFA). For this, they recruited 734 total students, and identified 400 students as belonging to one of the three severity categories they'd outlined -- the breakdown being 34% borderline, 40.5% acute, and 25.5% chronic. The most severely affected age group was 16- to 20-years-old at 56%, while 21 to 25 was the next highest age group at 34%. As well, men represented 57.5% of the categories, while women represented 42.5%.

As a result of the EFA, the two researchers were also able to identify half a dozen factors referred to in the study as "selfitis motivations" -- they include social competition, seeking attention, modifying mood, boosting self-confidence, conformity, and enhancing one's environment.

The researchers note that the study has some limitations, including that the data was self-reported and "subject to many well-known biases." However, it indicates that a mental disorder like "selfitis" could possibly exist and that it is worth further investigation. "As with internet addiction," the study states, "the concepts of “selfitis” and “selfie addiction” started as a hoax, but recent research including the present paper has begun to empirically validate its existence."

Via: PetaPixel


Adaptalux’ miniature lighting studio gets Laser, UV, and Arm-s lighting arms

Filed Under News: Digital Photography Review

Adaptalux Studio, the miniature lighting studio launched on Kickstarter in 2015, is on the receiving end of some new special effect lighting attachments called the EFX Lighting Arms. The new lighting arms bring three special effects to Adaptalux Studio: Laser, UV (ultraviolet), and Arm-s (super-bright with a TIR lens).

As with the existing Adaptalux arms, these new EFX Lighting Arms plug directly into the Studio and are flexible enough to be arranged in nearly any position. Adaptalux explains that its UV EFX arm features a purple anodized connector, while the Arm-s has a silver finish connector and the Laser arm has a red finish connector, helping distinguish them from each other and existing arms.

The UV EFX arm features a UV LED coupled with a UV Band Pass Filter, the latter of which is able to filter out 99% of visible light, according to Adaptalux. The Arm-s EFX arm, meanwhile, has a super bright white LED joined by a built-in TIR lens, which "greatly improves the amount of light reaching the subject," the company explains. Finally, the Laser EFX arm features laser diodes with a focus-able lens to produce a red beam of light.

Adaptalux has 48 hours left in its EFX Lighting Arms Kickstarter campaign, where it's already raised about $16,000 more than it needed to bring this idea to fruition. But funded or not, backers have 2 more days to get a single pack of either the Laser Arm or Arm-s Arm for a pledge of $50, a single pack with the UV Arm single pack for a pledge of at least $70, or a triple pack with all three arms for a pledge of $160.

Here are video intros to all three of the new arms, embedded for your viewing pleasure:

Shipping to Laser/Arm-s single pack backers is expected to start next April, while UV single pack backer shipments are expected to start in May 2018. To learn more or put down your pledge before the campaign ends, head over to Kickstarter.


2018 Shoot & Share Photo Contest opens for entries on January 8th

Filed Under News: Digital Photography Review

Wanna pit your skills against tens of thousands of other photographers... for free? You'll soon have your chance. The 2018 Photo Contest by Shoot & Share—which bills itself as the world’s only free & fair photo contest—will start accepting entries on January 8th.

What sets this particular contest apart is the voting process. No hoity-toity group of judges sifting through your entries, the whole system is democratic.

Every entrant is allowed to submit up to 50 photos in a total of 25 categories, and those photos are voted on by everyone else (including you). Photos are shown to you at random, and you vote for your favorites. As Shoot & Share explains it, "No one knows who took the photos, but everyone votes for the winners. The photos with the most votes win!"

Here's a fun intro video Shoot & Share put together:

The democratic draw of this contest as summed up best, perhaps, by DPReview Editorial Manager Wenmei Hill:

"It's huge, it's free, and it's a big ego boost (or destroyer, depending on how good a photographer you are) for tons of photographers."

Prizes for the 2018 contest haven't been revealed yet, but all 25 categories will have 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners, in addition to a Grand Prize Winner for the contest as a whole. According to the contest site, "Last year, there was over $1,200,000 in free memberships, software, credit, gifts, workshops, and more," given away.

Not bad for a totally free and extremely democratic contest.

To learn more about the 2018 Photo Contest or see last year's winners, head over to the contest website. And if you plan to participate, you have just over a week to curate your best shots for submission.


Yongnuo announces YN 14mm F2.8 Canon lens clone

Filed Under News: Digital Photography Review

Yongnuo has made a name for itself as the go-to brand for cheap photo gear, and that includes several Canon lens knock-offs that sacrifice some quality while slashing 60-80% or even more off the price. So far, Yongnuo has released clones of Canon's 50mm F1.8, 35mm F2, 85mm F1.8, and 100mm F2. And today, they add one more to the list.

Meet the Yongnuo YN 14mm F2.8: a lens that looks suspiciously similar to Canon's own 14mm F2.8L II. Here they are side by side:

According to Yongnuo's description, the YN 14mm F2.8 sports 12 lens elements in 9 groups (Canon's has 14 elements in 11 groups) and a 7-blade aperture (Canon's has 6 blades). The minimum focusing distance (0.2 meters), aperture range (F2.8-F22), magnification (0.15x), and angle of view (114°) are all identical.

The big difference—in addition to the quality of the lens build itself, and the quality of the glass used—is the focus motor. The Canon 14mm F2.8L II USM has an ultrasonic motor, while Yongnuo's 14mm clone sports a standard DC motor—expect a much louder experience if you're going to try out this lens.

Finally, the Yongnuo 14mm F2.8 will feature the same USB connection as the company's 100mm F2 clone, allowing for firmware updates that could help sand down the lens' rougher edges after it makes its way into consumer hands.

For now, we don't know when the Yongnuo YN 14mm F2.8 will officially arrive at online retailers, but we'll keep an eye out for you.

As for cost, the Canon version retails for $2,100. And while we don't yet know exactly how much Yongnuo plans to charge for the YN 14mm F2.8, you can bet it'll cost a whole lot less than two grand. To give you a frame of reference, Canon's 100mm F2 USM lens goes for $500; the Yongnuo knock-off is just 160 bucks.

To learn more about this lens, head over to the Yongnuo website.