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Archive for June, 2017

Jun
30

3 things that will bug photographers about the Polaroid movie trailer

Filed Under News: Digital Photography Review

If you want more proof that the youth are taking an interest in film photography, you'll have to travel no farther than your local multiplex this summer. 'Polaroid' the film – but not that kind of film – arrives in US theaters this August, and promises plenty of 'Ring'-style scares and thrills. In fact, it's produced by the same minds that brought us 'The Ring' and 'The Grudge,' so you can pretty much guess how things go when a high school student stumbles across an antique Polaroid camera and starts photographing her friends.

On the surface it looks like your average popcorn-friendly flick, but photographers may have a hard time looking past a few bothersome details we spotted in the trailer. Here they are in no particular order.

The flash is comically bright and doesn't do anything

Is the flash on this camera powered directly by the sun? How has anyone who’s been photographed by this camera retained their eyesight? It’s unbelievably bright. On top of that, it doesn’t even seem to have any effect on the image – the first subject we see photographed looks to be lit only by the tungsten bulb next to her despite a blinding flash that lit up the whole room.

The screeching flash capacitor

Not only is it needlessly bright, the flash makes a piercing noise as the capacitor supposedly charges it. An entire studio of professional strobes all re-charging at once wouldn't make that much noise. It's way too loud for a small on-camera flash, and should be an obvious clue that demons inhabit this camera.

The pristine instant film that comes with an antique camera

This camera came out of a dusty old box with a bunch of film in mint condition? Okay, sure. Maybe possessed Polaroids have a much longer shelf life than the garden-variety stuff. If that's the case, somebody let the Impossible Project know.

Be sure to watch the full trailer (if you've got the stomach for it) and let us know in the comments if we missed anything.

Jun
30

Rolling shutter explained with simple side-by-side examples

Filed Under News: Digital Photography Review

We hold accurate technical knowledge in pretty high regard around here, which is why this video from YouTube channel SmarterEveryDay was such a pleasant surprise.

In 7 minutes, engineer Dustin Sandlin does a fantastic job explaining rolling shutter with plenty of useful examples where he simulates the rolling shutter effect using high-speed camera footage and After Effects. In this way, he can actually show you how rolling shutter distortion happens; in fact, he can recreate it perfectly:

In the example above, he basically recreates what happens in every single frame of a 24fps iPhone video when you're recording an airplane propeller. As the green line moves down, it scans the prop... but the prop is moving, and so it's causing this strange distortion known as the 'rolling shutter effect.'

In this example, he actually traces the lines as your camera is seeing them over the course of the exposure:

You will capture different patterns depending on which way the propeller is rotating, but it's not a guessing game. You can actually visualize it when you slow the footage way down the way Dustin has.

But he doesn't stop with propellers (which is where most breakdowns of rolling shutter end), he goes on to show you how this affects cell phone video of all kinds of things. Fidget spinners, a coin spinning on a table top, guitar and mandolin strings, you name it: the rolling shutter effect visualized and simulated/recreated by using high speed footage.

Definitely check out the full video up top to really see rolling shutter in action. If you've always had a hard time conceptualizing how the rolling shutter effect worked, and why it produced the shapes it does, you won't find a better side-by-side comparison than this.

And if you like this, definitely check out Dustin's YouTube channel. This is far from the only interesting, educational and just plain cool thing on SmarterEveryDay.

Jun
30

Lee launches new set of high-end ProGlass IRND filters for stills shooters

Filed Under News: Digital Photography Review

Two years in the making, Lee Filters has just announced that it is bringing its highly-regarded ProGlass IRND cinematography filters to the world of stills photography. The company calls these 'a new standard' in ND filters, claiming they are, "remarkably neutral, with almost no color shift and extremely accurate stop values."

The high-end filters will be available through the Seven5, 100mm and SW150 systems, and since they block both IR and UV pollution, they should deliver cleaner colors that require far less work in post-production.

This example, available in interactive form on the Lee website, comes from an unedited RAW file:

The new line will come in six different strengths: 2-stop, 3-stop, 4-stop, 6-stop, 10-stop, all the way up to an impressive 15-stop filter. And the 6, 10, and 15-stop models each feature additional foam light insulation to ensure there are no light leaks, no matter how long the exposure.

Shot with a 0.6ND medium grad Shot with a 0.6ND medium grad and the 4.5ND (15-stop) ProGlass IRND

For more information, and to watch a demo video, visit the Lee Filters website. The ProGlass IRND Filter systems are available to stills shooters today in Seven5, 100mm and SW150 versions for £132.00 ($172 USD), £150.00 ($195 USD), and £346.00 ($450 USD), respectively.

Press Release


ProGlass IRND Filters


Two years in the making, the ProGlass IRND range from LEE Filters sets a new standard in neutral-density filters.

ProGlass IRND filters were originally designed for the film industry, to meet the exacting needs of the world’s leading cinematographers, and have already been hailed as the best neutral-density filters on the market. Now, they are available to the stills photographer, in sizes to fit the LEE Filters Seven5, 100mm and SW150 systems.

Advances in coating technology mean that the filters, which are manufactured from 2mm-thick, optically flat glass, are available not only in strengths of two (0.6ND), three (0.9ND), four (1.2ND) and six (1.8ND) stops, but also in ultra-long 10 (3ND) and 15-stop (4.5ND) versions. Not only this, but all filters in the range – whatever their strength – are designed to be free of colour casts, with extremely accurate stop values, ensuring consistency in all shooting conditions and allowing for absolute precision when exposing images. Their neutrality also means less time spent tweaking colour balances in postproduction.

In addition, filters in the ProGlass IRND range are designed to block both infrared and ultraviolet pollution. As a result, blacks are rendered truly black, whites are clean, and results reveal a crispness that is second to none.


The 6, 10 and 15-stop versions of the ProGlass IRND filters come with a foam seal to prevent light leaks during long exposures, and should be placed into the filter slot closest to the lens. While the 2, 3, 4 and 6-stop versions do not feature a foam seal, it is still recommended also to place them into the slot closest to the lens.

All filters in the ProGlass IRND range can be used in conjunction with other filters, including neutral-density grads and the polariser.

Pricing
ProGlass IRND Filter (Seven5 System) – £132.00 each (Excl VAT)
ProGlass IRND Filter (100mm System) – £150.00 each (Excl VAT)
ProGlass IRND Filter (SW150 System) – £346.00 each (Excl VAT)

For further information, contact LEE Filters on +44 (0) 1264 366245; sales@leefilters.com; www.leefilters.com


Jun
30

Lee launches new set of high-end ProGlass IRND filters for stills shooters

Filed Under News: Digital Photography Review

Two years in the making, Lee Filters has just announced that it is bringing its highly-regarded ProGlass IRND cinematography filters to the world of stills photography. The company calls these 'a new standard' in ND filters, claiming they are, "remarkably neutral, with almost no color shift and extremely accurate stop values."

The high-end filters will be available through the Seven5, 100mm and SW150 systems, and since they block both IR and UV pollution, they should deliver cleaner colors that require far less work in post-production.

This example, available in interactive form on the Lee website, comes from an unedited RAW file:

The new line will come in six different strengths: 2-stop, 3-stop, 4-stop, 6-stop, 10-stop, all the way up to an impressive 15-stop filter. And the 6, 10, and 15-stop models each feature additional foam light insulation to ensure there are no light leaks, no matter how long the exposure.

Shot with a 0.6ND medium grad Shot with a 0.6ND medium grad and the 4.5ND (15-stop) ProGlass IRND

For more information, and to watch a demo video, visit the Lee Filters website. The ProGlass IRND Filter systems are available to stills shooters today in Seven5, 100mm and SW150 versions for £132.00 ($172 USD), £150.00 ($195 USD), and £346.00 ($450 USD), respectively.

Press Release


ProGlass IRND Filters


Two years in the making, the ProGlass IRND range from LEE Filters sets a new standard in neutral-density filters.

ProGlass IRND filters were originally designed for the film industry, to meet the exacting needs of the world’s leading cinematographers, and have already been hailed as the best neutral-density filters on the market. Now, they are available to the stills photographer, in sizes to fit the LEE Filters Seven5, 100mm and SW150 systems.

Advances in coating technology mean that the filters, which are manufactured from 2mm-thick, optically flat glass, are available not only in strengths of two (0.6ND), three (0.9ND), four (1.2ND) and six (1.8ND) stops, but also in ultra-long 10 (3ND) and 15-stop (4.5ND) versions. Not only this, but all filters in the range – whatever their strength – are designed to be free of colour casts, with extremely accurate stop values, ensuring consistency in all shooting conditions and allowing for absolute precision when exposing images. Their neutrality also means less time spent tweaking colour balances in postproduction.

In addition, filters in the ProGlass IRND range are designed to block both infrared and ultraviolet pollution. As a result, blacks are rendered truly black, whites are clean, and results reveal a crispness that is second to none.


The 6, 10 and 15-stop versions of the ProGlass IRND filters come with a foam seal to prevent light leaks during long exposures, and should be placed into the filter slot closest to the lens. While the 2, 3, 4 and 6-stop versions do not feature a foam seal, it is still recommended also to place them into the slot closest to the lens.

All filters in the ProGlass IRND range can be used in conjunction with other filters, including neutral-density grads and the polariser.

Pricing
ProGlass IRND Filter (Seven5 System) – £132.00 each (Excl VAT)
ProGlass IRND Filter (100mm System) – £150.00 each (Excl VAT)
ProGlass IRND Filter (SW150 System) – £346.00 each (Excl VAT)

For further information, contact LEE Filters on +44 (0) 1264 366245; sales@leefilters.com; www.leefilters.com


Jun
30

CineStill 50D Film in 120 format goes up for pre-order

Filed Under News: Digital Photography Review

CineStill has launched its 50D film in 120 format, currently offering it for pre-order with an anticipated August 2017 shipping date. The 50D is a color-balanced daylight (5500K) color negative motion picture film; CineStill explains that its 'Premoval' process, which is proprietary, enables photographers to safely process the film at home or using standard C-41 chemicals. CineStill first introduced this film in late 2014.

This fine grain ISO 50/18° speed film is ideal for landscape and portrait photography, according to CineStill, which claims that its 50D product offers 'unrivaled highlight and shadow latitude.' The company says this film has been tested to have a shelf life of up to 1.5 years, though buyers are advised to use it within 6 months after purchase; price is $11.99 per roll.

The full list of features as provided on the 50D product page:

  • Color Balanced Daylight (5500K) color negative motion picture film stock for use as still photography film
  • ISO 50/18° in C-41 or ECN-2 Process
  • Factory spooled with self-adhesive labels inside
  • Remjet backing free, resulting in a unique halation effect
  • Unrivaled highlight and shadow latitude
  • Dynamic accurate color rendition
  • High resolution with maximum sharpness
  • Enhanced Scanning Performance
  • Great for portraits and landscapes
  • Recommended to process C-41 without worrying about remjet

Via: PetaPixel

Jun
30

Weekly Photography Challenge – Fireworks

Filed Under Digital Photography School, Photography Tips and Tutorials

Previously I rounded up 21 images of fireworks to get you into a celebratory mood. Now it’s your turn!

By Norm Lanier

Weekly Photography Challenge – Fireworks

Your mission this week is to find a fireworks display and photograph it. If there isn’t one in your area perhaps start with a sparkler and get someone to hold it or wave it around for you so you can practice.

If you need some tips try these:

By CL Photographs

By Sebastian

By Rob Watling

By Sue Ann Simon

By Courtney Carmody

Share your images below:

Simply upload your shot into the comment field (look for the little camera icon in the Disqus comments section) and they’ll get embedded for us all to see or if you’d prefer, upload them to your favorite photo-sharing site and leave the link to them. Show me your best images in this week’s challenge. Sometimes it takes a while for an image to appear so be patient and try not to post the same image twice.

Share in the dPS Facebook Group

You can also share your images on the dPS Facebook group as the challenge is posted there each week as well.

The post Weekly Photography Challenge – Fireworks by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.

Jun
30

Video: Those ‘Shot on iPhone’ ads are not what they seem

Filed Under News: Digital Photography Review

Anybody who knows about the technique and gear involved in capturing great photos and video knows to look at those 'shot on *insert smartphone here*' ads with a bit of skepticism. Yes, they were technically shot on those phones, but many people don't realize the amount of extra gear and software that goes into the final product.

There is a disclaimer at the end of these videos, of course, but it's easy to miss or subconsciously ignore it when you're hoping against hope that your iPhone 7 Plus will be the last camera you'll ever need.

Have you noticed this disclaimer at the end of the 'Shot on iPhone' ads?

In this short video, YouTuber Marques Brownlee sheds a bit of light on the matter, sharing a little behind the scenes look at some of the really intense gear these commercials use, before diving into some more affordable options that can help get your smartphone video—shot on iPhone or otherwise—closer to those professional grade commercials.

Because while you'll probably never use a rig this advanced:

It's not unthinkable that you could buy yourself a DJI Osmo Mobile and some Moment lenses to help get your shaky hand-held attempts a little closer to the results you see in Apple and Samsung's professional ads.

Just don't beat yourself up if your first few tries don't live up to this level of quality. We don't know exactly what gear Apple used on its latest 'Shot on iPhone' commercials, but we're betting it's closer to the crazy rig you see above, than the pared down little stabilizer and smartphone lenses Brownlee touts in his video.

Jun
30

21 Explosive Images of Fireworks Displays

Filed Under Digital Photography School, Photography Tips and Tutorials

This weekend is a holiday celebration in both Canada and the USA. Yesterday was Canada’s 150 birthday and coming up is the US Independence Day. Both usually come with some pretty good fireworks displays.

Here are some images of fireworks to get you into the celebration mood:

By maf04

By Miroslav Petrasko

By David Yu

By George Makris

By wiley photo

By Jeff Krause

By Yann Caradec

By Rhian Tebbutt Photography

By Kelly DeLay

By Xavier Benech

By J-Ph Derout

By Colin Knowles

By Sumarie Slabber

By d.sag

By peaceful-jp-scenery (busy)

By Colin Knowles

By Tim RT

By Benjamin Lehman

By Chris Phutully

By Ashley

By Spencer Tweedy

The post 21 Explosive Images of Fireworks Displays by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.

Jun
30

These Courses WILL Make You a Better Photographer (70% Off Today)

Filed Under Digital Photography School, Photography Tips and Tutorials

We’re already halfway through our popular mid year sale and we’re really excited to offer you this deal, because we love helping people discover how to take great photos and we know this one will help do just that.

For the next 30 hours we’re offering our entire range of online photography courses at a massive 70% OFF.

Normally $99 each, today you can get any of our five courses for just $29 (USD) each. That’s incredible value!

These step-by-step courses created by talented photography experts include:

Each course is packed with series of tutorials, with demonstrations shot in high-quality video by professional photographers, and you can follow along at your own pace.

You get lifetime access to these courses, so you don’t have to rush to finish them and you can go back and review topics any time you like.

Check out all the discounted courses here on our courses page for the next 30 hours only and start improving your photography today.

The post These Courses WILL Make You a Better Photographer (70% Off Today) by Darren Rowse appeared first on Digital Photography School.

Jun
30

Tips from a pro: photographing fireworks with John Cornicello

Filed Under News: Digital Photography Review

Photographing fireworks with John Cornicello

Seattle-based photographer John Cornicello specializes in portraits, but has been photographing fireworks for years. He's presented a class on it for CreativeLive, and with the Fourth of July weekend upon us, we figured we'd take a look at some of the major takeaways from Cornicello's class.

For the nitty gritty details, check out Cornicello's blog post on the subject here. All images and content used with permission.

Location

Once the show starts, you're not likely to spend much time running around for different vantage points, although this of course depends on the length of said show. If possible, scout in advance, and look for clean views without power lines or trees in the way.

Scouting in advance is particularly advisable because it's harder to spot these distractions in the darkness, and if you're not careful, you can have black silhouettes intruding in your otherwise perfect image.

Looking for establishing landmarks can give your photos a little more context, to "establish a setting and help tell a story," Cornicello says.

Stability

Most obviously, a tripod is the best tool for the job here. If you don't have one and can't get one in time, other options – outdoor furniture, fenceposts, the roof of your car – can all work in a pinch, but you won't have the flexibility a tripod offers.*

If you must use those other options, keep in mind you can adjust the height angle of your camera with whatever props you can find to wedge underneath it; a wallet and cell phone combination can be all you need to get your lens up to the correct height.

If you have the means, a remote trigger can help keep the camera from moving at all from a press of the shutter button. Lastly, since you'll be focusing near infinity and likely not moving much, it's best to stabilize your focus by locking it in manual focus if your camera allows that.


* It's true that many cameras have extremely effective built-in image stabilizers these days, but few of them are up to multi-second shutter speeds, regardless of whether you're zoomed out or in. The possible exception may be Olympus' newer interchangeable lens models, but you're still likely to get more keepers by stabilizing your camera externally.

Exposure

Now this is one that Cornicello says people tend to overthink. As he says, 'Fireworks are bright!' You don't necessarily need to raise your ISO to astronomical levels or have a fast lens to get good results. So let's switch into 'Manual' mode and get everything dialed in.

Keep your ISO around 100 or 200 and stop down the lens – F8 is a good starting point, though Cornicello notes that displays have been getting brighter, so F11 or F16 may be necessary. Start with a 1/2-second or 1-second shutter speed time, and adjust your shutter speed from there as necessary depending on how many bursts you want to capture in a single image.

Also, it's okay to chimp here to check that your settings are working as intended – just don't get too carried away and miss the whole show.

And please, if your camera has a built-in flash, make sure it's disabled. "The flash won't help with the fireworks... but it will tend to annoy the people around you," Cornicello says.

Gear

You'll need a camera of some sort; having a full-frame DSLR or high-end mirrorless camera is obviously great, but even an app offering manual control of your smartphone camera will get you some usable images.

Zoom lenses are great for fireworks, as they let you change up your framing without having to leave your carefully scouted location. And since we're stopping down, even a kit lens with a basic interchangeable lens camera or fixed-lens camera will work fine.

Cornicello points out that a zoom lens not only allows you to zoom to change your composition between shots, but you can also experiment with zooming during your exposure; you can also play with the manual focus during your exposure to mix things up further. We've touched on this earlier, but if your camera or lens features in-camera stabilization, it's best to shut it off as they are mostly meant for handheld applications.

A few other goodies to have on hand? Cornicello recommends a small flashlight to help you change settings in the failing light, as well as extra batteries and a large memory card. Earplugs are, of course, down to personal taste and requirements.

The wrap

Photographing fireworks can be a fun way to turn a social outing you were already planning for into a photo outing with relative ease. If you're new to photography, or just got your first interchangeable lens camera or a pocket camera with manual controls, it's a great way to experiment and become more comfortable with exposure settings.

Head on over to John Cornicello's blog for, in particular, more details on exposure and useful gear to have for the occasion.

And of course, we mustn't forget the most important piece of advice Cornicello has to offer: Have fun!

Do you have any other tips or tricks you use when photographing fireworks? Have some images of your own you'd like to share? Let us know in the comments!