Nikon KeyMission action cameras listed as discontinued on maker’s websites

Nikon now lists its KeyMission action cameras as discontinued on its UK and Japan websites, a change first spotted by Nikon Rumors. The maker's UK website lists the KeyMission 80 as "discontinued," though neither the KeyMission 170 or 360 models show the same notice. The Nikon Japan website lists the KeyMission 360 as an "old product," but doesn't include the KeyMission 80 or 170 models under its discontinued action camera page.

The Nikon USA website does not currently list any of the KeyMission cameras as discontinued and is still selling all three models. The Nikon UK website is still selling the KeyMission 360 model, but lists the 170 as out of stock and the 80 as discontinued. Existing inventory is still available to purchase through online retailers like B&H Photo.

We have reached out to Nikon for an official statement.

Via: Nikon Rumors

Nikon KeyMission action cameras listed as discontinued on maker’s websites

Nikon now lists its KeyMission action cameras as discontinued on its UK and Japan websites, a change first spotted by Nikon Rumors. The maker's UK website lists the KeyMission 80 as "discontinued," though neither the KeyMission 170 or 360 models show the same notice. The Nikon Japan website lists the KeyMission 360 as an "old product," but doesn't include the KeyMission 80 or 170 models under its discontinued action camera page.

The Nikon USA website does not currently list any of the KeyMission cameras as discontinued and is still selling all three models. The Nikon UK website is still selling the KeyMission 360 model, but lists the 170 as out of stock and the 80 as discontinued. Existing inventory is still available to purchase through online retailers like B&H Photo.

We have reached out to Nikon for an official statement.

Via: Nikon Rumors

Leica participates in Light $121 million Series D funding round

As far as camera makers go, Leica and Light could not be further apart. Leica has a rich photographic heritage and, at least in the minds of many photographers, stands for beautifully manufactured mechanical devices. Light is a very new company and with its 16-sensor L16 camera is by many regarded as a spearhead of innovation in digital imaging.

Nonetheless - or maybe because of those differences - Leica is now an investor and shareholder in Light. The latter just announced a $121 million Series D funding round led by SoftBank Vision Fund. Leica is one of the participants in the round as well, investing an undisclosed amount.

The company confirms that we will see Light-powered smartphones later this year

In the announcement the company confirms that we will see Light-powered smartphones later this year and says it is planning to use the funding to expand in sectors beyond consumer imaging.

“The new funding will allow Light to expand the reach of its imaging platform beyond consumer photography and into security, robotic, automotive, aerial and industrial imaging applications,”

Leica on the other hand seems to be hoping to get its hands on on some of the computational imaging technologies that Light is developing.

“With the rapid development of the computational photography, partnering with the innovators at Light [allows] Leica to extend its tradition of excellence into the computational photography era.”

Leica participates in Light $121 million Series D funding round

As far as camera makers go, Leica and Light could not be further apart. Leica has a rich photographic heritage and, at least in the minds of many photographers, stands for beautifully manufactured mechanical devices. Light is a very new company and with its 16-sensor L16 camera is by many regarded as a spearhead of innovation in digital imaging.

Nonetheless - or maybe because of those differences - Leica is now an investor and shareholder in Light. The latter just announced a $121 million Series D funding round led by SoftBank Vision Fund. Leica is one of the participants in the round as well, investing an undisclosed amount.

The company confirms that we will see Light-powered smartphones later this year

In the announcement the company confirms that we will see Light-powered smartphones later this year and says it is planning to use the funding to expand in sectors beyond consumer imaging.

“The new funding will allow Light to expand the reach of its imaging platform beyond consumer photography and into security, robotic, automotive, aerial and industrial imaging applications,”

Leica on the other hand seems to be hoping to get its hands on on some of the computational imaging technologies that Light is developing.

“With the rapid development of the computational photography, partnering with the innovators at Light [allows] Leica to extend its tradition of excellence into the computational photography era.”

How to Create a Luminous Look for Your Photographs

Today let’s talk about one of the final processes of creating an artful image. Let’s talk about THE LOOK. This refers to the overall feeling your images projects to a viewer. This look is often created during post-production here in the digital age, or it can be created in camera. Either way, the final look and feel of your image are just as important as all the technical requirements that went into the initial exposure.

Create a Luminous Look - tide on the beach

In this case, a soft focus was added in post-processing to help lighten the image.

There are lots of different looks that you can create with your images, everything from a bleached look to something with super rich colors. There’s also the hyper-realistic style where you process your work to create a gritty look. Today though we’re going to focus on the luminous look.

Defining the Luminous Look

To fully understand the luminous look lets start with a full understanding of the characteristics of a photograph that looks and feels luminous. Dictionary.com defines the word luminous in the following way:

Adjective

  1. Radiating or reflecting light; shining; bright.
  2. Lighted up or illuminated; well-lighted: the luminous ballroom.
  3. Brilliant intellectually; enlightened or enlightening, as a writer or a writer’s works: a luminous concept; luminous prose.

This means one of the main focuses when creating a luminous photograph is to consider the feeling the light will create in the image.

Luminous could mean the image glows. This means it feels like the light seeps from the image out towards the viewer. The best way to achieve this look is to shoot towards the light source. The goal is to make the light central to the look and feel of the image.

You will notice that there are still dark areas that contrast with all of the light. This is important. The goal is not to wash out the image but to create that feeling of all-around soft bright light.

Glowing

Let’s study the following images to understand how one creates a glowing, luminous look and feel within a photograph. Below is the initial photograph, unprocessed. The RAW image was shot in a local forest. I was attracted to the soft light coming through the forest that illuminated this tiny spring flower.

spring flower - Create a Luminous Look

This was shot at 1/80th, f/5.6, ISO 1000.

In post-processing, several elements were slightly adjusted. In the image below the highlights were enhanced and the exposure was raised a little. The tones were also warmed. All adjustments were completed in Lightroom. The goal was to make it feel as if the light permeated the scene with warmth.

Create a Luminous Look - spring flower with warmer tones

After processing – notice how much lighter and airier the image is now.

The second image was edited using the Nik Efex software from Google. I love their analog looks. I chose a preset then made some adjustments to the image, controlling the brightness and the amount of vignette in the image. A matte feel was also added to this second version.

Create a Luminous Look

Processing using Nik Efex.

The essential concept when creating an image that has a luminous glowing feeling is to ensure that the light softly reaches all corners of the image.

Using Fog and Mist

Another way to create a luminous look is to take advantage of fog and mist. Photographs shot in their natural conditions won’t glow in the same way but the luminous look can be achieved when shooting in foggy conditions. The fog softens the view and can make the viewer feel as if the scene is still filled with light.

In the case of the image below, the fog and the mist completely obscured our view of the countryside. The entire top of the mountain, however, glowed with a diffused light. The 2km hike straight up the side of the mountain was still worth it for the ghostly quiet we experienced while standing on one of the highest peaks in Wales.

Create a Luminous Look - mountain top in the fog

Pen-y-Fan is one of the highest mountains in Wales and the view from the top is supposed to be spectacular. Our grueling hike to the top did not reveal expansive views but rather this eerily silence. It was still worth the effort.

The Miky Look

A third way to create a luminous look is to process an image so that it feels milky in nature. These means that post-processing produces a softer feeling image that doesn’t necessarily contain brightness or dark contrasts but rather one that feels soft and light but muted.

Here’s the original unedited image. The soft muted colors and the fog are elements that will help to achieve the milky look. Strong contrasts and bright bold colors do not lend themselves to creating this style.

ocean waves - Create a Luminous Look

The deserted beaches around Borth, Wales were a perfect spot for shooting images with soft gentle tones.

To process the image and complete the milky look I used warmer tones, adjusted the vignette, and lightened the corners of the image. I used a faded film preset and gave the whole image a light greenish tone. Then, I adjusted the haze slider in Lightroom. I wanted the whole image to feel very light but also very soft.

Create a Luminous Look

Processed for a milky, almost retro look.

Using Lens Flare

One final technique to consider is the use of lens flare to help create images that look and feel luminous. Lens flare is one of my favorite techniques to use in experiments. I love the effect of so much light permeating the image and also the unique shapes created as the light refracts in your camera.

The following images are all floral in nature but the light is refracted in each image in different ways. In some cases, it’s the shape of the bokeh in other cases it’s lens flare.

yellow tulip - Create a Luminous Look

Perhaps this image is more about the bokeh in the background. Beautiful circular spots of light softly illuminate the flower.

There wasn’t much editing that went into the photograph of the tulip above. A touch of vibrancy was added to heighten the colors and the exposure was adjusted slightly. The focus is also a little soft which helps lend itself to the soft bright feel of this image.

Create a Luminous Look

You might be able to classify this image as having a glowing look but the sunlight is obscured by the flowers and the majority of the image is not in sharp focus. The light and the shallow depth of field bring this flower image into the realm of luminous abstract.

Here is an example of the classic lens flare. This image, while the same subject matter as above, was processed with more blue tones and a different depth of field. The goal was to include that star-shaped flare of light.

The Look is About Creative Interpretation

Creating a look and feel for your images is an important part of the creative process. These days the majority of our efforts are focused on creating a look in post-processing. That doesn’t have to be the case, it is possible to create a look in camera as well.

The luminous look is just one of many different creative styles you can utilize in your work. Choosing a look is about deciding how you want the image to be presented to the viewer. It’s also about the message you wish to communicate. Finally, creating a look is about your artistic interpretation of a scene. Wanting to take something like a dreary rainy day and make it feel bright and airy is just as valid as capture the reality you see before you.

So it’s time to experiment with different looks. Give the luminous look a try and show off your best work in the comments below.

The post How to Create a Luminous Look for Your Photographs appeared first on Digital Photography School.

Video: How phase detection autofocus works

Have you ever wondered how your DSLR's autofocus works? Wonder no more! YouTuber ZY Productions has created a succinct video that details how phase detection autofocus (PDAF) systems work inside DSLR cameras.

As noted in the video, phase detection autofocus applies specifically to DSLRs, since it relies on a dedicated autofocus sensor and a translucent section of a DSLR's mirror to achieve focus — components you won't find inside a mirrorless camera.

The exact type of autofocus system depends entirely on what camera you have. Newer DSLRs have robust autofocus systems, with more image coverage and more cross-type focus points — the importance of which is documented in the video — while older cameras might not have as much coverage or as many cross-type focus points (if any at all).

Regardless of what DSLR you use and how capable its autofocus system is, knowing how your camera's autofocus works and what its shortcomings are should help you to overcome any issues and limitations you come across.

If you'd like a more robust explanation, Photography Life has a great article explaining the process in more detail.

Leica X-U (Typ 113) Sample Gallery

The Leica X-U (Typ 113) inherits the 16MP APS-C sensor and 35mm-equivalent F1.7 lens from the company's 'X' compact camera into a waterproof, ruggedized, go-anywhere body. Although the X-U was released in early 2016, our recent experience with waterproof compact cameras got us thinking - how much more performance would $3000 extra buy us? We've been putting the X-U through its paces, from lakes in the foothills of the Cascade Mountains all the way to the 1950m / 6400ft Sunrise viewpoint in Mount Rainier National Park.

Click through our sample gallery to see the sorts of images the Leica X-U is capable of, and keep an eye out for our more detailed impressions in the coming weeks.

5 Camera Bags That Every Travel Photographer Needs At Some Point

One of the great things about being a travel photographer is that you are almost always working outside. Sometimes this might be in a city and sometimes in the wilderness. Either way, one of the main attributes you will need is to be organized. This involves everything from research and planning, to your shot list and efficiency. It also includes being organized with your equipment and what you will need on a day to day basis.

There is a fine balance between carrying too much unnecessary equipment and what you actually will need. A vital part of carrying your equipment is choosing the right bag for the scenario you are going to be photographing. Not only are camera bags important in keeping your equipment safe and dry, but a good bag will also make it easier to carry equipment.

Especially when you will potentially be walking around all day. There are so many bags to choose from, so here are the five types of bags that you may need at some point.

person on a cliff overlooking the water - 5 Camera Bags That Every Travel Photographer Needs At Some Point

#1 – Day Bag

A day bag is usually the first bag that most people would purchase. It will also be the bag that gets the most usage. So it’s vital that you take into account the different options available to fit your needs. Before you rush out and buy one, consider the following factors:

day bag for camera gear - 5 Camera Bags That Every Travel Photographer Needs At Some Point

  • Size – What will you generally be carrying day to day? Most travel photographers will carry a telephoto lens and possibly a couple of smaller lenses. You may also carry a flash as well as memory cards, batteries and possibly a second camera.
  • Tripod – The first day bag that I ever purchased, didn’t have a way to attach and carry my tripod. I quickly realized how frustrating and tiring that was. Carrying a tripod means you are constantly having to put it down every time you want to take a photo. So when fleeting moments arrive you are not ready to snap away.
  • Non-photography space – Another big consideration when purchasing a day bag is how much additional space you will have to carry non-photographic items. For example, can you carry a bottle of water? Or a rain jacket? Is there somewhere safe and hidden away that you can keep your keys, mobile phone or even cash?
  • Accessibility – Would you really want to take everything out of your bag to get to those plasters right at the bottom? How quickly and easily you can access the various compartments of your bag is very important. For example, some bags will allow you to get your camera out from a side zipper without having to open the whole thing up.
  • Comfort – As a travel photographer you will often be out walking for hours. Being able to carry your equipment comfortably can mean the difference between going back to the hotel because you’re uncomfortable and in pain or carrying on.
  • Airline carry-on – Another consideration is whether your bag complies with the carry-on regulations of airlines. I always carry my camera equipment on the plane (I put my tripod in my suitcase) rather than check it in so have to make sure that my bag isn’t too big.

All of these are factors that need to be considered before purchasing a day bag. It’s taken me a few attempts to find the perfect day bag but my choice is the Lowepro ProTactic 450 camera bag.

It has plenty of storage for two cameras as well as a couple of other lenses and things like memory cards and batteries. It has a top zip, as shown below, that makes it easy to access my camera without needing to open the whole bag. I can also carry a large tripod attached to the bag as well.

5 Camera Bags That Every Travel Photographer Needs - Lowepro ProTactic 450 AW Camera Backpack

#2 – Hiking Bag

While a day bag is great for everyday use, sometimes it’s simply not big enough. For those photographers who like to hike or camp overnight, then a day bag won’t be able to hold all of your camera equipment and additional things needed like a tent, food, and water.

So the next bag up from a day bag is a hiking bag. But again it’s important to consider the factors below before purchasing your hiking bag.

5 Camera Bags That Every Travel Photographer Needs - man sitting on a rock by the ocean

  • Size – The first criteria for your hiking bag is the size that you will need. This will come down to what you are planning to photograph and the duration of your hike/trek. For example, if you are planning to camp overnight you will need space for a tent and sleeping bag. But if your hikes are one day ones then you could get away with something smaller. Factor in all the items you will need such as spare clothes, a first aid kit and even cooking utensils as well as your camera gear. Then find a bag to fit what you will be carrying.
  • Water reservoir – This might seem like a trivial point when considering a bag, but being able to have a drink without having to take your bag off is incredibly useful. So one thing that I would always recommend is buying a bag that either comes with a water reservoir or one that you can fit one into. You don’t want to have to constantly stop and take your bag off every time you want to have a drink.
  • Waterproof – Most outdoor bags these days will be somewhat shower proof, but some bags also come with a rain cover that you can place over the bag. These sometimes sit under the bag and can easily be accessed when you need them.
  • Adjustable – On any long walk or hike, comfort is vital. So look for a bag that allows you to be able to adjust the straps to fit your posture. The best thing to do is to try out your given bag for a few hours with your equipment locally before setting out on your trip.

My personal choice for a hiking bag is the Lowepro Pro Trekker 650 AW camera backpack. As I rarely camp overnight, this bag is big enough to carry my camera equipment and any additional daily items. There is also a side pocket for a water reservoir (not included) and you can strap a large tripod to it as well.

#3 – Sling Bag

There are times that even a day bag is too big and cumbersome to carry around. Sometimes all you need is a small bag to carry your camera and a few additional accessories. Sling bags are useful for this purpose and also because you can get things in and out without having to take your bag off.

There may also be occasions (i.e. in busy events) where you can keep your bag in front of you thus making it less inviting to pickpockets and thieves. You won’t be able to carry a lot of equipment or strap your tripod to it, but a good sling bag should still have plenty of room for what you need.

I pack my sling bag into my suitcase (it folds flat) and will use it on occasions when I don’t need to take a lot of equipment. For example, some museums or viewing platforms don’t allow backpacks whereas you’ll be okay with a sling bag.

My sling bag of choice is an older version of the Lowepro Passport Sling III camera bag. It’s surprisingly spacious for its size and I can fit my DSLR as well as a wide-angle lens and a telephoto lens inside. It also has space for memory cards and batteries as well as outside pockets which are useful for things like a water bottle.

sling bag - travel photographers camera bags

#4 – Toploader

These small camera bags are only big enough for one camera and one lens (if you want it for a telephoto lens make sure you purchase the bigger size). The real benefit of these bags are that you can keep your camera on your hip for easy access. So rather than having to take your bag off to pack or unpack your camera you can simply place in this bag as and when you need to.

I find that this is especially beneficial on long hikes or treks when I sometimes may not take a photo for long periods of time but I still have it on hand when a moment presents itself.

The less obvious benefit of these bags, which I realized recently, is when traveling by air. Airlines can be very picky about the weight of your checked-in luggage. So if you find that you are over the limit you can place some items from your luggage into this bag and take it onboard. For example, on a recent trip I was able to place the head from my tripod and few other small but heavy items into this bag and avoid paying the excess weight charge.

I take my Lowepro Toploader Pro 70 AW II camera case with me on every trip. If I can, I pack it in my suitcase and use it where necessary. If my suitcase is full, I put my camera in it and carry it onto the plane in addition to my day bag.

Lowepro Toploader bag - travel photographers camera bags

#5 – Hard Case

Another option to consider for traveling are hard cases. These are suitcases which are made of a tough material which is waterproof and dustproof. They are especially designed for transporting camera equipment.

The benefit of these cases is that your equipment will be safe inside from damage. But they are generally only useful for transportation rather than day to day use. Some of the latest models are designed with a camera backpack inside which allows you to wear it like a traditional day bag. But having tested one a while ago, they are not as comfortable as the traditional day bags.

Personally I have never found a need for one to date as I carry all my equipment in my backpack. But if you are going to be traveling to harsh conditions or face the likelihood of your equipment getting wet than it would be worth investing in a hard case.

Summary

Camera bags might not be the first accessory that comes to mind when building your photography equipment inventory, but they are incredibly important. Not only will they keep your equipment safe, but they might stop you from being uncomfortable or even in pain because of the weight you are carrying.

The important thing is to not rush out and buy all of the above at once. Over the years as the need arises, you can invest in a new bag. So, think carefully about what you need and do some research into the different types of bags available.

What camera bags do you have or find useful? Please share your recommendations below.

The post 5 Camera Bags That Every Travel Photographer Needs At Some Point appeared first on Digital Photography School.

Gitzo teams up with Sony to launch tripod and L-bracket designed for α-series cameras

As part of a collaboration between Vitec Group and Sony, Gitzo has introduced a new pair of products designed specifically for Sony α7 and α9 cameras: the Traveler α Tripod and the L-Bracket α.

The new products 'feature a tailored design to perfectly fit Sony α7 and α9 camera models, helping to increase grip and stability for precise framing and extraordinary composition,' according to Vitec Group.

Gitzo's new Traveler α is a 'premium travel tripod' featuring a new design and monochromatic color scheme to match the appearance of Sony α-series cameras. It weighs just 1.43kg/3.15lbs, opens to 165cm/64.96in and holds up to 10kg/22lbs of gear. Like Gitzo's other travel tripods, the Traveler α folds down to just 43cm/16.93in when using the 180-degree leg-folding system.

The legs themselves are constructed of Carbon eXact tubing and use the Traveler G-lock system for securing the proper height. The Traveler α is paired with Gitzo's 'most compact professional carbon fiber tripod head [...] engineered to provide the ultimate smoothness and precision of movement and secure locking with independent pan/tilt lock.' To wrap it all up, the special-edition tripod includes a genuine Italian leather carry strap designed to mimic the aesthetic of carbon fiber.

The second new product is the L-Bracket α, which Gitzo calls 'the lightest of its kind on the market,' weighing in at just 77g/2.7oz. The bracket is milled from a single piece of aluminum 'to become one with the most high-level professional mirrorless cameras on the market.' Its design includes four attachment points for camera straps, an open design for easy access to ports and cables. There's also a dedicated spot for the hex keys and accessories so you don't need to carry another bag of tools around.

The Gitzo Traveler α costs $999.99, while the Gitzo L-Bracket α will set you back $199.99. They are available now on Gitzo's online shop and authorized dealers.

Some Cool Tools For Editing Your Photos Inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018

In this third installment of articles on ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018, we look at some of the Cool Tools – either new features or ones that are particularly useful. Read my first two articles here:

New Features

1. ACTIONS

Newly implemented in the latest release of the software, Actions are a range of predefined edits that you can apply to your image to achieve a specific look or effect. To assist you with this, there is an Actions Browser that lets you see the effect applied in advance, which is extremely useful.

Some Cool Tools For Editing Your Photos Inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018

Image with the Actions Browser open.

There are 16 different categories covering color, black and white, workflow, editing, special effects, portrait and landscape options, and more. Once you decide on the desired Action, click PLAY and it is applied.

Some Cool Tools For Editing Your Photos Inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018

Example of a Split-tone Action.

Some Cool Tools For Editing Your Photos Inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018

A black and white conversion Action applied.

To apply an Action, you need to open your image in Edit mode. On the top menu bar, look for Tools > Browse Actions.

2. LIQUIFY

Liquify is often used in fashion and portrait editing to change the shape of people or parts of their bodies. It is a new feature in this release of ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018. This tool needs to be applied with a large soft brush and a delicate touch or it can look overly obvious.

I found the Liquify tool very easy to use. It worked quickly (i.e. there was no lag on processing the change) and had a gentler effect than I was expecting.

Some Cool Tools For Editing Your Photos Inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018 - liquify

This is the before image for comparison.

Some Cool Tools For Editing Your Photos Inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018

Showing where the effect had been applied.

Some Cool Tools For Editing Your Photos Inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018 - liquify

Image after Liquify applied to the arch and bowl of the spoon, and the dark side of the main blueberry.

Using the Liquify Tool

Liquify is a function in Edit mode, so you need to open your image up in there. On the top menu bar, select Filter > Geometry > Liquify.

There are four different Liquify modes:

  1. Shift – This moves pixels from one area to another in the direction you move the brush.
  2. Pinch – This moves the pixels towards the center of the brush (making things smaller).
  3. Brush – This moves pixels away from the center of the brush (making things bigger).
  4. Restore – Undo mode for any of the three options above.

Once Liquify mode is active, check that your brush is the correct size and softness (a larger and softer brush is recommended) and very gently click and nudge the area you want to adjust a tiny amount. It is much easier to do lots of little adjustments as you can undo one if you go too far.

Also be mindful that when you use Liquify it moves all the pixels within the brush, so if you have any lines or other elements, they can be affected too. This can make it obvious that you have used Liquify, so be careful about the backgrounds and surrounding elements in the area you’re using it.

3. FREQUENCY SEPARATION

This is a function used a lot in portrait and fashion photography – anywhere there is a lot of skin visible, especially faces and close-ups. Frequency separation allows you to smooth out blemishes and imperfections, to even out the skin tones, and provide a polished outcome in the image.

While it can be done manually, it is time-consuming to set up. Now with a few clicks, the software does all the layers for you, making it easy to apply the effect where necessary. I don’t photograph people or close up portraits so have never had the need to use this functionality, but for those who want to access this advanced technique, ACDSee has included it.

Using the Tool

Open your image in Edit mode and in the Layers pane, duplicate the layer. Frequency Separation is a destructive edit, so it is recommended that you work on a duplicated layer to maintain image integrity.

Select the top layer (the duplicate), then right-click and select Frequency Separation from the drop-down box. It will then create two layers – one will be grey and have (HF) in the layer description. The other one will be in color, but will be all blurry and have (LF) in the layer description.

On the LF layer, use a brush to work on any skin imperfections. On the HF layer, use the Repair tool to clone clear skin over top of the blemish areas.

4. PIXEL TARGETING

The Pixel Targeting tool allows you to select specific areas in your image based on a combination of tone and color selection. It works in conjunction with an adjustment layer.

In Edit mode, open up your image and select an adjustment layer (any of them seem to be fine). Here I am using a shot of some bright red raspberries and a Vibrance adjustment layer.

Right-click on the top layer and select Pixel Targeting and a panel will open up. The top sliders allow you to select the tones and the bottom sliders allow you to select the colors.

Some Cool Tools For Editing Your Photos Inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018

Adjust the tone and the color sliders to suit. It creates a mask of the subject that you want to adjust.

Save a preset for future use (use the Save option at the top of the screen) and click OK.  The mask you have just created in the Pixel Targeting window is now applied to your adjustment layer, and it will only apply the adjustment to the light areas of the mask.

Here I have turned the raspberries blue simply by adjusting the Hue sliders in the Vibrance layer.

Some Cool Tools For Editing Your Photos Inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018

Useful Features

While learning how to use ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018, there were several things about it that I found particularly useful. These are either the small things that don’t get used a lot but work really well when you do need to use them, or something that makes it much easier to do a really common task.

These are things I appreciate, especially when something you do a lot is made easier, or offers a clever alternative.

1 – Add a File as a Layer

Some Cool Tools For Editing Your Photos Inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018

At the bottom of the Layers pane are a whole lot of quick access icons for different layer features. The one circled here is the “Add a File as a Layer” option.

I do a couple of specific tasks that require the addition of outside images as extra layers, such as adding texture overlays and compositing.

There are lots of other instances when this could be useful – focus stacking, blending panorama or astrophotography images, time-lapse stacking, and so on.

This is a particularly common function and the way Photoshop does it is really NOT user-friendly. I have always gotten around it by using a second monitor and dragging my image in that way.

But if you are working on a laptop or only have one layer, that isn’t an option, so this feature becomes worth knowing about.

It’s really simple. Click on the Add a File as a Layer icon and a dialog box opens up asking you to select the location of the image you want to add. Even better, you can switch your view to Thumbnail and see examples of the images so you can select the right one.

Click on the desired file and select Open. The file will then open up as a new layer. It will probably need to be resized and the program has that mode already activated for you as well. Drag the yellow handles to the right size, select Commit, and you are done!

Some Cool Tools For Editing Your Photos Inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018

2. Heal Tool

Sometimes you might have a mark, a blemish, or a stray hair or twig in the way on your shot, and you don’t notice until you see it on the big screen when you are editing. Technology has improved so much these days that software can often take care of those issues for you, but it can still be a less than polished outcome.

When editing my blueberry shots, I was dismayed to find that I hadn’t noticed my main berry had a scratch down the front of it. Great chance to give the Heal tool inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate a go.

I was quite impressed with how well it works. Just right-click on a good area and then paint over the blemish area. I find doing lots of small selections gives a more natural effect usually, but ACDSee did a really good job.

Some Cool Tools For Editing Your Photos Inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018

After the Heal tool was applied.

Some Cool Tools For Editing Your Photos Inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018

Before Heal tool applied – you can clearly see the big scratch on the front of the berry.

Conclusion

Before writing these articles, I had never used ACDSee software at all. My background was with PaintShop Pro, Photoshop, and Lightroom. Learning about the full range and capabilities of this ACDSee program has been interesting. There are some really exciting new features and useful tools included, particularly in Edit mode.

Overall I have been impressed at the depth and capability of ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate. For a beginner wanting a one-stop-shop program at a cost-effective price (and no subscription model), it has a lot of benefits.

For anyone looking to get started in managing their photo files, processing RAW images, and more in-depth editing, this is a good place to start. If you’re looking for a non-subscription option, it is worth considering as well.

Disclaimer: ACDSee is a dPS advertising partner.

The post Some Cool Tools For Editing Your Photos Inside ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School.

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